Diff for /wikisrc/tutorials/how_to_set_up_nfs_and_nis.mdwn between versions 1.3 and 1.4

version 1.3, 2014/11/24 02:18:26 version 1.4, 2020/05/26 07:24:36
Line 57  After this, we must initialise all files Line 57  After this, we must initialise all files
 The -m means we are creating a master server. On more complex networks, you can even want slave servers. The tool will ask you for a list of YP servers to bind to.     The -m means we are creating a master server. On more complex networks, you can even want slave servers. The tool will ask you for a list of YP servers to bind to.   
 Since we're only using one server, just press RETURN (make sure your own server's internal address is in the list).   Since we're only using one server, just press RETURN (make sure your own server's internal address is in the list). 
   
 Before we run `make' in /var/yp, as the tool says, we must enable the NIS deamons: rpcbind, ypserv and ypbind (in that order). After that, we can run `make' in /var/yp.   Before we run `make' in /var/yp, as the tool says, we must enable the NIS daemons: rpcbind, ypserv and ypbind (in that order). After that, we can run `make' in /var/yp. 
   
 To test if your setup is working, try yptest. It should spew out the passwd file among others, so don't panic ;)   To test if your setup is working, try yptest. It should spew out the passwd file among others, so don't panic ;) 
   
Line 96  If everything is working, you are ready  Line 96  If everything is working, you are ready 
   
 would first look up usernames/passwords/uids in /etc/passwd, and if it can't find it, it would look it up using NIS. Right after changing this file, you should be able to log in on your system using a username which is only in /etc/passwd on the server. That's all there is to it.   would first look up usernames/passwords/uids in /etc/passwd, and if it can't find it, it would look it up using NIS. Right after changing this file, you should be able to log in on your system using a username which is only in /etc/passwd on the server. That's all there is to it. 
   
 #  The deamons   #  The daemons 
   
 What are all those daemons for? Well, here's a quick rundown:   What are all those daemons for? Well, here's a quick rundown: 
   
Line 114  Setting up NFS is a piece of cake. Just  Line 114  Setting up NFS is a piece of cake. Just 
      /home              -network 192.168.0.0 -mask 255.255.0.0 -maproot=root       /home              -network 192.168.0.0 -mask 255.255.0.0 -maproot=root
           
   
 This exports /home only on the LAN 192.168.x.x. The maproot line is needed, because otherwise the client's root will not have superuser access. Now, start the mount daemon and the NFS deamons (mountd and nfsd) as root on your server, in that order. For that type:   This exports /home only on the LAN 192.168.x.x. The maproot line is needed, because otherwise the client's root will not have superuser access. Now, start the mount daemon and the NFS daemons (mountd and nfsd) as root on your server, in that order. For that type: 
           
      root@mars# /etc/rc.d/rpcbind onestart       root@mars# /etc/rc.d/rpcbind onestart
      root@mars# /etc/rc.d/mountd onestart       root@mars# /etc/rc.d/mountd onestart

Removed from v.1.3  
changed lines
  Added in v.1.4


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