Diff for /wikisrc/ports/xen/howto.mdwn between versions 1.71 and 1.77

version 1.71, 2015/01/04 02:14:15 version 1.77, 2015/01/17 01:36:44
Line 274  For debugging, one may copy xen-debug.gz Line 274  For debugging, one may copy xen-debug.gz
 to DIAGNOSTIC and DEBUG in NetBSD.  xen-debug.gz is basically only  to DIAGNOSTIC and DEBUG in NetBSD.  xen-debug.gz is basically only
 useful with a serial console.  Then, place a NetBSD XEN3_DOM0 kernel  useful with a serial console.  Then, place a NetBSD XEN3_DOM0 kernel
 in /, copied from releasedir/amd64/binary/kernel/netbsd-XEN3_DOM0.gz  in /, copied from releasedir/amd64/binary/kernel/netbsd-XEN3_DOM0.gz
 of a NetBSD build.  Both xen and NetBSD may be left compressed.  (If  of a NetBSD build.  If using i386, use
 using i386, use releasedir/i386/binary/kernel/netbsd-XEN3PAE_DOM0.gz.)  releasedir/i386/binary/kernel/netbsd-XEN3PAE_DOM0.gz.  (If using Xen
   3.1 and i386, you may use XEN3_DOM0 with the non-PAE Xen.  But you
 With Xen as the kernel, you must provide a dom0 NetBSD kernel to be  should not use Xen 3.1.)  Both xen and the NetBSD kernel may be (and
 used as a module; place this in /.  Suitable kernels are provided in  typically are) left compressed.
 releasedir/binary/kernel:  
   In a dom0 kernel, kernfs is mandatory for xend to comunicate with the
         i386 XEN3_DOM0  kernel, so ensure that /kern is in fstab.  TODO: Say this is default,
         i386 XEN3PAE_DOM0  or file a PR and give a reference.
         amd64 XEN3_DOM0  
   
 The first one is only for use with Xen 3.1 and i386-mode Xen (and you  
 should not do this).  Current Xen always uses PAE on i386, but you  
 should generally use amd64 for the dom0.  In a dom0 kernel, kernfs is  
 mandatory for xend to comunicate with the kernel, so ensure that /kern  
 is in fstab.  TODO: Say this is default, or file a PR and give a  
 reference.  
   
 Because you already installed NetBSD, you have a working boot setup  Because you already installed NetBSD, you have a working boot setup
 with an MBR bootblock, either bootxx_ffsv1 or bootxx_ffsv2 at the  with an MBR bootblock, either bootxx_ffsv1 or bootxx_ffsv2 at the
 beginning of your root filesystem, /boot present, and likely  beginning of your root filesystem, /boot present, and likely
 /boot.cfg.  (If not, fix before continuing!)  /boot.cfg.  (If not, fix before continuing!)
   
 See boot.cfg(5) for an example.  The basic line is  Add a line to to /boot.cfg to boot Xen.  See boot.cfg(5) for an
   example.  The basic line is
   
         menu=Xen:load /netbsd-XEN3_DOM0.gz console=pc;multiboot /xen.gz dom0_mem=256M          menu=Xen:load /netbsd-XEN3_DOM0.gz console=pc;multiboot /xen.gz dom0_mem=256M
   
 which specifies that the dom0 should have 256M, leaving the rest to be  which specifies that the dom0 should have 256M, leaving the rest to be
 allocated for domUs.  In an attempt to add performance, one can also  allocated for domUs.  To use a serial console, use
 add  
           menu=Xen:load /netbsd-XEN3_DOM0.gz console=com0;multiboot /xen.gz dom0_mem=256M console=com1 com1=9600,8n1
   
   which will use the first serial port for Xen (which counts starting
   from 1), forcing speed/parity, and also for NetBSD (which counts
   starting at 0).  In an attempt to add performance, one can also add
   
         dom0_max_vcpus=1 dom0_vcpus_pin          dom0_max_vcpus=1 dom0_vcpus_pin
   
Line 314  As with non-Xen systems, you should have Line 312  As with non-Xen systems, you should have
 kernel that works without Xen) and fallback versions of the non-Xen  kernel that works without Xen) and fallback versions of the non-Xen
 kernel, Xen, and the dom0 kernel.  kernel, Xen, and the dom0 kernel.
   
   Now, reboot so that you are running a DOM0 kernel under Xen, rather
   than GENERIC without Xen.
   
 Using grub (historic)  Using grub (historic)
 ---------------------  ---------------------
   
Line 332  Configuring Xen Line 333  Configuring Xen
   
 Xen logs will be in /var/log/xen.  Xen logs will be in /var/log/xen.
   
 Now, you have a system that will boot Xen and the dom0 kernel, and  Now, you have a system that will boot Xen and the dom0 kernel, but not
 just run the dom0 kernel.  There will be no domUs, and none can be  do anything else special.  Make sure that you have rebooted into Xen.
 started because you still have to configure the dom0 tools.  The  There will be no domUs, and none can be started because you still have
 daemons which should be run vary with Xen version and with whether one  to configure the dom0 tools.  The daemons which should be run vary
 is using xm or xl.  Note that xend is for supporting "xm", and should  with Xen version and with whether one is using xm or xl.  Note that
 only be used if you plan on using "xm".  Do NOT enable xend if you  xend is for supporting "xm", and should only be used if you plan on
 plan on using "xl" as it will cause problems.  using "xm".  Do NOT enable xend if you plan on using "xl" as it will
   cause problems.
   
 The installation of NetBSD should already have created devices for xen  The installation of NetBSD should already have created devices for xen
 (xencons, xenevt), but if they are not present, create them:  (xencons, xenevt), but if they are not present, create them:
Line 883  configuration.  The big issue is usually Line 885  configuration.  The big issue is usually
 is booted, because the kernel is nominally in the dom0 filesystem (to  is booted, because the kernel is nominally in the dom0 filesystem (to
 which VPS users do not normally have acesss).  A second issue is how  which VPS users do not normally have acesss).  A second issue is how
 to install NetBSD.  to install NetBSD.
   
 A VPS user may want to compile a kernel for security updates, to run  A VPS user may want to compile a kernel for security updates, to run
 npf, run IPsec, or any other reason why someone would want to change  npf, run IPsec, or any other reason why someone would want to change
 their kernel.  their kernel.
Line 894  or to select from a prepopulated list.   Line 895  or to select from a prepopulated list.  
 kernel from the domU filesystem.  This is closer to a regular physical  kernel from the domU filesystem.  This is closer to a regular physical
 computer, where someone who controls a machine can replace the kernel.  computer, where someone who controls a machine can replace the kernel.
   
   A second issue is multiple CPUs.  With NetBSD 6, domUs support
   multiple vcpus, and it is typical for VPS providers to enable multiple
   CPUs for NetBSD domUs.
   
 pygrub  pygrub
 -------  -------
   
Line 913  calls.  It is booted from the dom0 as th Line 918  calls.  It is booted from the dom0 as th
 that pvgrub works with FFsv2 with 16K/2K and 32K/4K block/frag sizes  that pvgrub works with FFsv2 with 16K/2K and 32K/4K block/frag sizes
 (and hence with defaults from "newfs -O 2").  See [Panix's pvgrub  (and hence with defaults from "newfs -O 2").  See [Panix's pvgrub
 page](http://www.panix.com/v-colo/grub.html), which describes only  page](http://www.panix.com/v-colo/grub.html), which describes only
 Linux but should be updated to cover NetBSD :-)  Linux but should be updated to cover NetBSD :-).
   
 [prgmr.com](http://prgmr.com/) also lets users with pvgrub to boot  [prgmr.com](http://prgmr.com/) also lets users with pvgrub to boot
 their own kernel.  See then [prgmr.com NetBSD  their own kernel.  See then [prgmr.com NetBSD
 HOWTO](http://wiki.prgmr.com/mediawiki/index.php/NetBSD_as_a_DomU).  HOWTO](http://wiki.prgmr.com/mediawiki/index.php/NetBSD_as_a_DomU)
   (which is in need of updating).
   
 It appears that [grub's FFS  It appears that [grub's FFS
 code](http://xenbits.xensource.com/hg/xen-unstable.hg/file/bca284f67702/tools/libfsimage/ufs/fsys_ufs.c)  code](http://xenbits.xensource.com/hg/xen-unstable.hg/file/bca284f67702/tools/libfsimage/ufs/fsys_ufs.c)
 does not support all aspects of modern FFS, but there are also reports  does not support all aspects of modern FFS, but there are also reports
 that FFSv2 works fine.  At prmgr, typically one has an ext2 or FAT  that FFSv2 works fine.  At prgmr, typically one has an ext2 or FAT
 partition for the kernel with the intent that grub can understand it,  partition for the kernel with the intent that grub can understand it,
 which leads to /netbsd not being the actual kernel.  One must remember  which leads to /netbsd not being the actual kernel.  One must remember
 to update the special boot partiion.  to update the special boot partiion.

Removed from v.1.71  
changed lines
  Added in v.1.77


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