Diff for /wikisrc/ports/xen/howto.mdwn between versions 1.33 and 1.39

version 1.33, 2014/12/24 15:54:50 version 1.39, 2014/12/24 16:13:59
Line 152  Therefore, this HOWTO recommends running Line 152  Therefore, this HOWTO recommends running
 xl, the NetBSD 6 stable branch, and to use an amd64 kernel as the  xl, the NetBSD 6 stable branch, and to use an amd64 kernel as the
 dom0.  Either the i386 or amd64 of NetBSD may be used as domUs.  dom0.  Either the i386 or amd64 of NetBSD may be used as domUs.
   
   Build problems
   --------------
   
   Ideally, all versions of Xen in pkgsrc would build on all versions of
   NetBSD on both i386 and amd64.  However, that isn't the case.  Besides
   aging code and aging compilers, qemu (included in xentools for HVM
   support) is difficult to build.  The following are known to fail:
   
           xenkernel3 netbsd-6 i386
           xentools42 netbsd-6 i386 
   
   The following are known to work:
   
           xenkernel41 netbsd-5 amd64
           xentools41 netbsd-5 amd64
           xenkernel41 netbsd-6 i386
           xentools41 netbsd-6 i386
   
 NetBSD as a dom0  NetBSD as a dom0
 ================  ================
   
Line 251  beginning of your root filesystem, /boot Line 269  beginning of your root filesystem, /boot
   
 See boot.cfg(5) for an example.  The basic line is  See boot.cfg(5) for an example.  The basic line is
   
 "menu=Xen:load /netbsd-XEN3_DOM0.gz console=pc;multiboot /xen.gz dom0_mem=256M"          menu=Xen:load /netbsd-XEN3_DOM0.gz console=pc;multiboot /xen.gz dom0_mem=256M
   
 which specifies that the dom0 should have 256M, leaving the rest to be  which specifies that the dom0 should have 256M, leaving the rest to be
 allocated for domUs.  allocated for domUs.  In an attempt to add performance, one can also
   add
   
           dom0_max_vcpus=1 dom0_vcpus_pin
   
   to force only one vcpu to be provided (since NetBSD dom0 can't use
   more) and to pin that vcpu to a physical cpu.  TODO: benchmark this.
   
 As with non-Xen systems, you should have a line to boot /netbsd (a  As with non-Xen systems, you should have a line to boot /netbsd (a
 kernel that works without Xen) and fallback versions of the non-Xen  kernel that works without Xen) and fallback versions of the non-Xen
Line 306  For 4.2 with xl (preferred), add to rc.c Line 330  For 4.2 with xl (preferred), add to rc.c
 TODO: Recommend for/against xen-watchdog.  TODO: Recommend for/against xen-watchdog.
   
 After you have configured the daemons and rebooted, run the following  After you have configured the daemons and rebooted, run the following
 to inspect Xen's boot messages, available resources, and running  (or use xl) to inspect Xen's boot messages, available resources, and
 domains:  running domains:
   
         xm dmesg          xm dmesg
         xm info          xm info
         xm list          xm list
   
 Updating NetBSD in a dom0  Updating NetBSD in a dom0
 -------------------------  -------------------------
Line 386  improves performance.  The other is that Line 411  improves performance.  The other is that
 failed to work.  TODO: give working/notworking NetBSD versions for  failed to work.  TODO: give working/notworking NetBSD versions for
 sparse vnd.  Note that the use of file/vnd for Xen is not really  sparse vnd.  Note that the use of file/vnd for Xen is not really
 different than creating a file-backed virtual disk for some other  different than creating a file-backed virtual disk for some other
 purpose, except that xentools handles the vnconfig commands.  purpose, except that xentools handles the vnconfig commands.  To
   create an empty 4G virtual disk, simply do
   
           dd if=/dev/zero of=foo-xbd0 bs=1m count=4096
   
 With the lvm style, one creates logical devices.  They are then used  With the lvm style, one creates logical devices.  They are then used
 similarly to vnds.  similarly to vnds.
Line 419  create a new file and vnconfig it (or lv Line 447  create a new file and vnconfig it (or lv
 just like updating physical disks, but without having to be there and  just like updating physical disks, but without having to be there and
 without those pesky connectors.  without those pesky connectors.
   
   domU kernels
   ------------
   
   On a physical computer, the BIOS reads sector 0, and a chain of boot
   loaders finds and loads a kernel.  Normally this comes from the root
   filesystem.  With Xen domUs, the process is totally different.  The
   normal path is for the domU kernel to be a file in the dom0's
   filesystem.  At the request of the dom0, Xen loads that kernel into a
   new domU instance and starts execution.  While domU kernels can be
   anyplace, reasonable places to store domU kernels on the dom0 are in /
   (so they are near the dom0 kernel), in /usr/pkg/etc/xen (near the
   config files), or in /u0/xen (where the vdisks are).
   
   See the VPS section near the end for discussion of alternate ways to
   obtain domU kernels.
   
 Config files  Config files
 ------------  ------------
   
Line 583  working vif-bridge is also provided with Line 627  working vif-bridge is also provided with
   
     #!/bin/sh      #!/bin/sh
     #============================================================================      #============================================================================
     # $NetBSD: howto.mdwn,v 1.32 2014/12/24 15:31:36 gdt Exp $      # $NetBSD: howto.mdwn,v 1.38 2014/12/24 16:07:32 gdt Exp $
     #      #
     # /usr/pkg/etc/xen/vif-bridge      # /usr/pkg/etc/xen/vif-bridge
     #      #

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