File:  [NetBSD Developer Wiki] / wikisrc / ports / sandpoint / instsynology.mdwn
Revision 1.11: download - view: text, annotated - select for diffs
Sat Sep 5 19:18:06 2015 UTC (7 years, 2 months ago) by phx
Branches: MAIN
CVS tags: HEAD
Fix dummy.img.gz path.

    1: <a name="introduction"></a>
    2: Introduction
    3: ============
    4: 
    5: This document describes in depth how to prepare your Synology
    6: Diskstation for installing NetBSD/sandpoint. The following models are
    7: supported:
    8: 
    9: <table>
   10: <tbody>
   11: <tr class="odd">
   12: <td align="left"><strong>Model</strong></td>
   13: <td align="left"><strong>CPU</strong></td>
   14: <td align="left"><strong>Clock</strong></td>
   15: <td align="left"><strong>Disk</strong></td>
   16: <td align="left"><strong>RAM</strong></td>
   17: </tr>
   18: <tr class="even">
   19: <td align="left">DS-101g+</td>
   20: <td align="left">MPC8241</td>
   21: <td align="left">266MHz</td>
   22: <td align="left">SATA</td>
   23: <td align="left">64MB</td>
   24: </tr>
   25: <tr class="odd">
   26: <td align="left">DS-106</td>
   27: <td align="left">MPC8241</td>
   28: <td align="left">266MHz</td>
   29: <td align="left">SATA</td>
   30: <td align="left">64MB</td>
   31: </tr>
   32: <tr class="even">
   33: <td align="left">DS-106e</td>
   34: <td align="left">MPC8241</td>
   35: <td align="left">266MHz</td>
   36: <td align="left">SATA</td>
   37: <td align="left">32MB</td>
   38: </tr>
   39: <tr class="odd">
   40: <td align="left">DS-106j</td>
   41: <td align="left">MPC8241</td>
   42: <td align="left">200MHz</td>
   43: <td align="left">PATA</td>
   44: <td align="left">32MB</td>
   45: </tr>
   46: <tr class="even">
   47: <td align="left">DS-106x</td>
   48: <td align="left">MPC8241</td>
   49: <td align="left">266MHz</td>
   50: <td align="left">SATA</td>
   51: <td align="left">128MB</td>
   52: </tr>
   53: <tr class="odd">
   54: <td align="left">CS/RS-406</td>
   55: <td align="left">MPC8245</td>
   56: <td align="left">400MHz</td>
   57: <td align="left">SATA</td>
   58: <td align="left">128MB</td>
   59: </tr>
   60: <tr class="even">
   61: <td align="left">CS-406e</td>
   62: <td align="left">MPC8241</td>
   63: <td align="left">266MHz</td>
   64: <td align="left">SATA</td>
   65: <td align="left">64MB</td>
   66: </tr>
   67: <tr class="odd">
   68: <td align="left">DS-107</td>
   69: <td align="left">MPC8241</td>
   70: <td align="left">266MHz</td>
   71: <td align="left">SATA</td>
   72: <td align="left">64MB</td>
   73: </tr>
   74: <tr class="even">
   75: <td align="left">DS-107e</td>
   76: <td align="left">MPC8241</td>
   77: <td align="left">266MHz</td>
   78: <td align="left">SATA</td>
   79: <td align="left">32MB</td>
   80: </tr>
   81: <tr class="odd">
   82: <td align="left">DS-207</td>
   83: <td align="left">MPC8241</td>
   84: <td align="left">266MHz</td>
   85: <td align="left">SATA</td>
   86: <td align="left">64/128MB</td>
   87: </tr>
   88: <tr class="even">
   89: <td align="left">CS-407e</td>
   90: <td align="left">MPC8241</td>
   91: <td align="left">266MHz</td>
   92: <td align="left">SATA</td>
   93: <td align="left">64MB</td>
   94: </tr>
   95: <tr class="odd">
   96: <td align="left">DS-108j</td>
   97: <td align="left">MPC8241</td>
   98: <td align="left">200MHz</td>
   99: <td align="left">SATA</td>
  100: <td align="left">32MB</td>
  101: </tr>
  102: <tr class="even">
  103: <td align="left">DS-109j</td>
  104: <td align="left">MPC8241</td>
  105: <td align="left">266MHz</td>
  106: <td align="left">SATA</td>
  107: <td align="left">32MB</td>
  108: </tr>
  109: <tr class="odd">
  110: <td align="left">DS-209j</td>
  111: <td align="left">MPC8241</td>
  112: <td align="left">266MHz</td>
  113: <td align="left">SATA</td>
  114: <td align="left">64MB</td>
  115: </tr>
  116: </tbody>
  117: </table>
  118: 
  119: To install NetBSD/sandpoint you will have to open the case, to get access to
  120: the serial console, and connect a serial converter from TTL to RS232
  121: signal levels.
  122: 
  123: <a name="serial_access"></a>
  124: Accessing the serial interface
  125: ==============================
  126: 
  127: <a name="locate_header"></a>
  128: Locate the serial header
  129: ------------------------
  130: 
  131: Open the case and search for a 6-pin header, which is labeled `COM1` or
  132: `JP2`. The left photo shows a DS-101g+ and the right photo a DS-106j.
  133: Note that the serial header is rotated by 180 degrees between these two
  134: models:
  135: 
  136: <table>
  137: <tbody>
  138: <tr class="odd">
  139: <td align="left"><img src="//www.NetBSD.org/images/ports/sandpoint/syno_ser_header.jpg" alt=" Serial header in a DS-101g+ " /></td>
  140: <td align="left"><img src="//www.NetBSD.org/images/ports/sandpoint/syno_ser_header106.jpg" alt=" Serial header in a DS-106j " /></td>
  141: </tr>
  142: </tbody>
  143: </table>
  144: 
  145: **Serial header pin assignments:**
  146: 
  147: <table>
  148: <tbody>
  149: <tr class="odd">
  150: <td align="left"><table>
  151: <tbody>
  152: <tr class="odd">
  153: <td align="left"><strong>Pin number</strong></td>
  154: <td align="left"><strong>Function</strong></td>
  155: </tr>
  156: <tr class="even">
  157: <td align="left">1</td>
  158: <td align="left">3.3V</td>
  159: </tr>
  160: <tr class="odd">
  161: <td align="left">2</td>
  162: <td align="left">GND</td>
  163: </tr>
  164: <tr class="even">
  165: <td align="left">4</td>
  166: <td align="left">TX</td>
  167: </tr>
  168: <tr class="odd">
  169: <td align="left">6</td>
  170: <td align="left">RX</td>
  171: </tr>
  172: </tbody>
  173: </table></td>
  174: <td align="left"><img src="//www.NetBSD.org/images/ports/sandpoint/syno_ser_pins.jpg" alt="Header pin assignments" /></td>
  175: </tr>
  176: </tbody>
  177: </table>
  178: 
  179: Watch out for the thick, white angle, which marks pin 1.
  180: 
  181: <a name="serial_cable"></a>
  182: Connect a serial cable
  183: ----------------------
  184: 
  185: The serial port on Synology NAS boxes is using 3.3V TTL levels, which
  186: have to be converted into regular RS232 levels by a level shifter
  187: circuit. If you are not anxious using a soldering iron you find detailed
  188: instructions how to build such a converter here:
  189: 
  190: -   [Serial adapter for 3.3V TTL](http://www.NetBSD.org/ports/sandpoint/ttl2rs232.html)
  191: 
  192: <img src="//www.NetBSD.org/images/ports/sandpoint/syno_ser_adapter.jpg" alt="Serial adapter installed" /></td>
  193: 
  194: This picture shows the installed serial adapter. When the installation
  195: is completed, and the Diskstation is available over the network, you can
  196: remove the serial adapter again. You will only need it in emergency
  197: situations.
  198: 
  199: Another option is to buy such a converter. There are solutions for a
  200: standard RS232 interface and for an USB interface. Look out for:
  201: 
  202: -   RS232 level shifter / breakout board (MAX3232 based)
  203: -   USB to TLL serial level shifter / breakout board (FT232 based)
  204: 
  205: <a name="install"></a>
  206: First installation
  207: ==================
  208: 
  209: <a name="firmware_access"></a>
  210: Accessing the Firmware
  211: ----------------------
  212: 
  213: Provided the serial converter is installed and working correctly you
  214: should be able to connect to the firmware's serial console. Synology is
  215: using [PPCBoot](http://ppcboot.sourceforge.net/). Most models have
  216: version `2.0.0` installed, but the newer ones have network support and
  217: limited functionality ([read below](#post_install)).
  218: 
  219: Now you can connect with any terminal program to the Diskstation's
  220: serial console. The easiest approach may be to use NetBSD's `tip(1)` command
  221: to make a direct console connection at 115200bps.
  222: 
  223:     # tip -115200 console
  224: 
  225: Note that when using a serial connection via USB you may have to make an
  226: entry for `/dev/ttyU0` in `/etc/remote`. Immediately after switching
  227: your Diskstation on it will beep shortly, and you should see the
  228: following messages. Type CTRL-C within one second to avoid autobooting.
  229: In old firmwares (2005) you have three seconds and may press any key.
  230: 
  231:     PPCBoot 2.0.0 (Jan 30 2007 - 14:27:41)
  232: 
  233:     CPU:   MPC8245 Revision 1.4 at 199.999 MHz: 16 kB I-Cache 16 kB D-Cache
  234:     I2C:   ready
  235:     DRAM:  DRAM BANK = 1
  236:     MAX_DRAM_SIZE = 2000000
  237:     MCCR1 = 75a80000
  238:     MCCR4 = 35363331
  239:     MSAR1 = 0
  240:     EMSAR1 = 0
  241:     MEAR1 = 1f
  242:     EMEAR1 = 0
  243:     MSAR2 = 0
  244:     EMSAR2 = 0
  245:     MEAR2 = 0
  246:     EMEAR2 = 0
  247:     MBER = 32000001
  248:     PICR1 = 141b98
  249:     PICR2 = 40604
  250:     32 MB
  251:     addr_sp=1f2ff78, id=1f2ff98, addr=1fc0000
  252:     FLASH: flash id = 49
  253:     vendor = 1, flash id = 49 (flash_id:49)
  254:      2 MB
  255:     *** Warning - bad CRC, using default environment
  256: 
  257:     In:    serial
  258:     Out:   serial
  259:     Err:   serial
  260:     Net:   SK98#0
  261:     Press Ctrl+C to abort autoboot in 1 second
  262: 
  263: <a name="altboot"></a>
  264: altboot
  265: -------
  266: 
  267: The `altboot(8)` utility functions as a bridge between the Synology
  268: firmware and the NetBSD kernel startup environment. NAS firmware often
  269: provides no means to boot a kernel from disk or from the network and
  270: doesn't initialize all hardware correctly. We will also use it to pass a
  271: bootinfo list to the kernel.
  272: 
  273: The `altboot` boot loader has to be loaded into RAM at `0x1000000` and
  274: started using PPCBoot / U-Boot. Usually there are three ways to invoke
  275: it:
  276: 
  277: -   **loadb** to load a binary file via serial line in kermit mode
  278: -   **tftpboot** to load a binary file over the network with TFTP protocol
  279: -   start it from the flash memory
  280: 
  281: The last option is prefered once the installation is completed, but
  282: obviously it is not possible for the first time boot. Newer firmwares
  283: (2007) support the use of the network interface by setting the `ipaddr`
  284: and `serverip` environment variables with **setenv**. Once you have set up
  285: TFTP and DHCP ([read below](#altboot_install)) you can download
  286: `altboot` like this:
  287: 
  288: <pre>
  289: _MPC824X &gt; <strong>setenv ipaddr=192.168.0.106</strong>
  290: _MPC824X &gt; <strong>setenv serverip=192.168.0.5</strong>
  291: _MPC824X &gt; <strong>setenv netmask=255.255.255.0</strong>
  292: _MPC824X &gt; <strong>tftpboot 0x1000000 altboot.bin</strong>
  293: ARP broadcast 1
  294: TFTP from server 192.168.0.5; our IP address is 192.168.0.106
  295: Filename 'altboot.bin'.
  296: Load address: 0x1000000
  297: Loading: ###############
  298: done
  299: Bytes transferred = 74732 (123ec hex)
  300: </pre>
  301: 
  302: The old firmware (2005) doesn't activate the network at all, so we have
  303: to download `altboot` into RAM with Kermit protocol over the serial
  304: line.
  305: 
  306: Install `kermit(1)` from `pkgsrc(7)` or compile and install it yourself.
  307: To set up the file transfer you have to provide the following commands
  308: to `kermit`:
  309: 
  310:     set line /dev/tty00
  311:     set speed 115200
  312:     set carrier-watch off
  313:     set flow-control none
  314:     robust
  315:     set file type bin
  316: 
  317: For convenience you can write them into a file which you can pass as an
  318: argument to `kermit`.
  319: 
  320: Load `altboot` into memory using Kermit protocol. The binary is
  321: relocated at `0x1000000`, so type:
  322: 
  323: <pre>
  324: _MPC824X &gt; <strong>loadb 1000000</strong>
  325: ## Ready for binary (kermit) download ...
  326: </pre>
  327: 
  328: Now quit your terminal program and launch **kermit cmdfile**. When you are
  329: already running `kermit`, enter the command mode by typing `CTRL-\`
  330: followed by `C`. Then send `altboot.bin`. Reconnect when the transfer is
  331: finished.
  332: 
  333: <pre>
  334: C-Kermit 8.0.211, 10 Apr 2004, for NetBSD 1.6
  335:  Copyright (C) 1985, 2004,
  336:   Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York.
  337: Type ? or HELP for help.
  338: (/tmp/) C-Kermit><strong>send path_to/altboot.bin</strong>
  339: </pre>
  340: 
  341: <a name="altboot_install"></a>
  342: Boot the INSTALL kernel with altboot
  343: ------------------------------------
  344: 
  345: Now you can use `altboot` to launch the `netbsd-INSTALL` kernel for
  346: installing NetBSD. You may choose to load it with TFTP or from NFS. For TFTP
  347: you have to enable `tftpd(8)` in `/etc/inetd.conf`, and for NFS there is
  348: a documentation at [The Network File
  349: System](http://www.NetBSD.org/docs/guide/en/chap-net-services.html#chap-net-services-nfs).
  350: But in both cases you have to set up a DHCP server, which is explained
  351: in the [DHCP Howto](http://www.NetBSD.org/docs/network/dhcp.html). An
  352: appropriate `dhcpd.conf` entry could look like this:
  353: 
  354:             host ds101g {
  355:                     hardware ethernet 00:11:32:xx:xx:xx;
  356:                     fixed-address 192.168.0.101;
  357:                     next-server 192.168.0.1;
  358:                     option root-path "/export/ds101g/root";
  359:             }
  360: 
  361: The `root-path` option is only needed when using NFS and should match
  362: your exported NFS directory. Uncompress `netbsd-INSTALL.gz` from the
  363: NetBSD/sandpoint distribution and copy it into the NFS or TFTP directory.
  364: Then start the DHCP, NFS or TFTP server and boot the installation kernel
  365: from the firmware either with
  366: 
  367: <pre>
  368: _MPC824X &gt; <strong>go 1000000 tftp:netbsd-INSTALL</strong>
  369: </pre>
  370: 
  371: or from NFS:
  372: 
  373: <pre>
  374: _MPC824X &gt; <strong>go 1000000 nfs:netbsd-INSTALL</strong>
  375: </pre>
  376: 
  377: Our bootloader configures the hardware, determines the IP address, loads
  378: the kernel via network and launches it:
  379: 
  380:     ## Starting application at 0x01000000 ...
  381: 
  382:     >> NetBSD/sandpoint altboot, revision 1.5 (Fri Feb 18 23:21:15 CET 2011)
  383:     >> Synology DS, cpu 265 MHz, bus 132 MHz, 64MB SDRAM
  384:     channel 0 present
  385:     wd0: <SAMSUNG HD502HI> DMA LBA LBA48 476940 MB
  386:     wd0: no disklabel
  387:     MAC address 00:11:32:xx:xx:xx
  388:     100Mbps-FDX
  389:     loading "netbsd-INSTALL" 5089380+110916=0x4f5d6c
  390:     entry=0x00090000, ssym=0x005859a8, esym=0x00585d6c
  391:     ksyms: Symbol table not found
  392:     ksyms: String table not found
  393:     ksyms: Perhaps the kernel is stripped?
  394:     Copyright (c) 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005,
  395:         2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011
  396:         The NetBSD Foundation, Inc.  All rights reserved.
  397:     Copyright (c) 1982, 1986, 1989, 1991, 1993
  398:         The Regents of the University of California.  All rights reserved.
  399: 
  400:     NetBSD 5.99.43 (INSTALL) #5: Mon Jan 10 10:58:12 CET 2011
  401:         frank@compaq.owl.de:/home/frank/netbsd/current/src/sys/arch/sandpoint/compile/obj/INSTALL
  402:     total memory = 65536 KB
  403:     avail memory = 58028 KB
  404:     OpenPIC Version 1.2: Supports 1 CPUs and 26 interrupt sources.
  405:     mainbus0 (root)
  406:     cpu0 at mainbus0: 8245 (Revision 0.4), ID 0 (primary)
  407:     cpu0: HID0 0x90c000<DOZE,DPM,ICE,DCE>, powersave: 1
  408:     eumb0 at mainbus0
  409:     com0 at eumb0 unit 0: ns16550a, working fifo
  410:     com0: console
  411:     ociic0 at eumb0
  412:     iic0 at ociic0: I2C bus
  413:     rs5c372rtc0 at iic0 addr 0x32: RICOH RS5C372[AB] Real-time Clock
  414:     satmgr0 at eumb0 unit 1: button manager (synology)
  415:     pci0 at mainbus0 bus 0
  416:     pchb0 at pci0 dev 0 function 0
  417:     pchb0: vendor 0x1057 product 0x0006 (rev. 0x14)
  418:     satalink0 at pci0 dev 13 function 0: Silicon Image SATALink 3512 (rev. 0x01)
  419:     satalink0: using irq 16 for native-PCI interrupt
  420:     atabus0 at satalink0 channel 0
  421:     atabus1 at satalink0 channel 1
  422:     ohci0 at pci0 dev 14 function 0: vendor 0x1033 product 0x0035 (rev. 0x43)
  423:     ohci0: interrupting at irq 17
  424:     ohci0: OHCI version 1.0
  425:     usb0 at ohci0: USB revision 1.0
  426:     ohci1 at pci0 dev 14 function 1: vendor 0x1033 product 0x0035 (rev. 0x43)
  427:     ohci1: interrupting at irq 17
  428:     ohci1: OHCI version 1.0
  429:     usb1 at ohci1: USB revision 1.0
  430:     ehci0 at pci0 dev 14 function 2: vendor 0x1033 product 0x00e0 (rev. 0x04)
  431:     ehci0: interrupting at irq 17
  432:     ehci0: companion controllers, 3 ports each: ohci0 ohci1
  433:     usb2 at ehci0: USB revision 2.0
  434:     skc0 at pci0 dev 15 function 0: irq 18
  435:     skc0: Marvell Yukon Lite Gigabit Ethernet rev. (0x9)
  436:     sk0 at skc0 port A: Ethernet address 00:11:32:xx:xx:xx
  437:     makphy0 at sk0 phy 0: Marvell 88E1011 Gigabit PHY, rev. 5
  438:     makphy0: 10baseT, 10baseT-FDX, 100baseTX, 100baseTX-FDX, 1000baseT, 1000baseT-FDX, auto
  439:     biomask 8000038 netmask 8000038 ttymask 8000038
  440:     satalink0: port 0: device present, speed: 1.5Gb/s
  441:     wd0 at atabus0 drive 0: <SAMSUNG HD502HI>
  442:     wd0: 465 GB, 969021 cyl, 16 head, 63 sec, 512 bytes/sect x 976773168 sectors
  443:     uhub0 at usb0: vendor 0x1033 OHCI root hub, class 9/0, rev 1.00/1.00, addr 1
  444:     uhub1 at usb1: vendor 0x1033 OHCI root hub, class 9/0, rev 1.00/1.00, addr 1
  445:     uhub2 at usb2: vendor 0x1033 EHCI root hub, class 9/0, rev 2.00/1.00, addr 1
  446:     boot device: sk0
  447:     root on md0a dumps on md0b
  448:     root file system type: ffs
  449:     erase ^H, werase ^W, kill ^U, intr ^C, status ^T
  450:     Terminal type? [vt100]
  451: 
  452: Just follow the usual procedure to install a NetBSD system.
  453: 
  454: <img src="//www.NetBSD.org/images/ports/sandpoint/install_window.jpg" alt="Sandpoint installation window" /></td>
  455: 
  456: <a name="post_install"></a>
  457: Post installation steps
  458: =======================
  459: 
  460: After a successful installation you want to make the system boot
  461: standalone when switched on, without the need for a serial console. So
  462: you have to find a way to make your firmware automatically boot
  463: `altboot` and the kernel.
  464: 
  465: Note that newer Synology models, especially those from 2007, may have
  466: the **saveenv** command disabled. If you have one of those skip forward to
  467: [this](#new_firmware) section.
  468: 
  469: Old firmware (2005)
  470: -------------------
  471: 
  472: When you have an old firmware you just have to modify the `bootcmd`
  473: setting in PPCBoot's environment and write the `altboot.bin` binary to
  474: any free location of the Flash ROM.
  475: 
  476: To find a suitable place on the flash you can use the **flinfo** command
  477: and look out for empty sectors `(E)`. On my Synology box I have chosen
  478: `0xff400000`. Replace that in all the following commands if you have
  479: chosen a different address.
  480: 
  481: Load `altboot.bin` into memory at `0x1000000` again, as explained above.
  482: Then execute the following commands to write it to Flash ROM:
  483: 
  484: <pre>
  485: _MPC824X &gt; <strong>protect off all</strong>
  486: Un-Protect Flash Bank # 1
  487: _MPC824X &gt; <strong>erase ff400000 ff41ffff</strong>
  488: Erase Flash from 0xff400000 to 0xff41ffff 
  489: . done
  490: Erased 1 sectors
  491: _MPC824X &gt; <strong>cp.b 1000000 ff400000 18000</strong>
  492: Copy to Flash... done
  493: _MPC824X &gt; <strong>protect on all</strong>
  494: Protect Flash Bank # 1
  495: </pre>
  496: 
  497: Finally adapt the `bootcmd` environment string to auto-boot `altboot`
  498: and start the `netbsd` kernel (which is the default name) from `wd0` on
  499: each reboot:
  500: 
  501: <pre>
  502: _MPC824X &gt; <strong>setenv bootcmd cp.b ff400000 1000000 18000\; go 1000000 wd0:</strong>
  503: _MPC824X &gt; <strong>saveenv</strong>
  504: Saving Environment to Flash...
  505: unProtect FFF40000 ... FFF5FFFF
  506: Un-Protected 1 sectors
  507: Erasing Flash...
  508: . done
  509: Erased 1 sectors
  510: Writing to Flash... done
  511: Protected 1 sectors
  512: </pre>
  513: 
  514: The `\` is important for **setenv** not to misinterpret the `;` as the end
  515: of the command.
  516: 
  517: New firmware (2007)
  518: -------------------
  519: 
  520: Without a working **saveenv** command the only way to make your system
  521: automatically boot NetBSD is to replace the Linux kernel on flash by
  522: `altboot.img`, which is our bootloader in PPCBoot image format, faking a
  523: Linux kernel.
  524: 
  525: When viewing the environment variables with **printenv** you can see that
  526: the `bootcmd` is calling **bootm** to load the Linux kernel. The first
  527: address is the location which we have to overwrite with `altboot.img`.
  528: Here it is `0xffc00000`, which you have to replace in all the following
  529: commands, in case your `bootcmd` differs.
  530: 
  531:     bootcmd=bootm FFC00000 FFE00000
  532: 
  533: Load `altboot.img` into memory, for example at `0x1000000` again, as
  534: explained [above](#altboot). You might want to backup the Linux kernel
  535: image first. Then execute the following commands to overwrite it with
  536: `altboot.img`:
  537: 
  538: <pre>
  539: _MPC824X &gt; <strong>protect off all</strong>
  540: Un-Protect Flash Bank # 1
  541: _MPC824X &gt; <strong>erase ffc00000 ffc1ffff</strong>
  542: Erase Flash from 0xffc00000 to 0xffc1ffff 
  543: . done
  544: Erased 1 sectors
  545: _MPC824X &gt; <strong>cp.b 1000000 ffc00000 18000</strong>
  546: Copy to Flash... done
  547: _MPC824X &gt; <strong>protect on all</strong>
  548: Protect Flash Bank # 1
  549: </pre>
  550: 
  551: Optionally you may think about replacing the Linux RAM disk image at the
  552: second address (`0xffe00000` in the example above) by an empty PPCBoot
  553: image, like [this](http://www.NetBSD.org/~phx/Sandpoint/dummy.img.gz) one
  554: (do not forget to uncompress it with `gunzip(1)`). Or use **mkubootimage** to
  555: make your own dummy. Write it to flash as shown above. This will speed up the
  556: boot process, but is not really required.
  557: 
  558: Have fun with your mini NetBSD server!

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