File:  [NetBSD Developer Wiki] / wikisrc / ports / mvme68k.mdwn
Revision 1.1: download - view: text, annotated - select for diffs
Sat Dec 22 23:04:05 2012 UTC (8 years, 8 months ago) by mspo
Branches: MAIN
CVS tags: HEAD
add more port pages

    1: [[!template id=port
    2: port="mvme68k"
    3: cur_rel="6.0"  
    4: future_rel="7.0"
    5: changes_cur="6.0"
    6: changes_future="7.0"
    7: thumbnail="http://www.netbsd.org/images/ports/mvme68k/mvme167b.gif"
    8: about="""
    9: NetBSD/mvme68k is the port of NetBSD to Motorola's 68k VME Single Board
   10: Computers (SBC). The first Motorola SBC was introduced in 1988. Motorola
   11: has continued development on 68k and PowerPC based SBC VME modules.
   12: 
   13: Development activity on NetBSD/mvme68k continues at a speed that depends
   14: on people's spare time and access to hardware. NetBSD runs on the
   15: original Motorola 68k VME SBC (MVME147), the 68040 based MVME162 (LX
   16: 200/300 and the new P2/P4 series based on the Petra ASIC), MVME167 and
   17: the 68060 based MVME172 (LX 200/300 and Petra P2/P4) and MVME177 boards.
   18: 
   19: Originally ported by Chuck Cranor based on Paul Mackerras' old DA30
   20: code, NetBSD/mvme68k has been supported since the [NetBSD 1.1
   21: release](../../releases/formal-1.1/).
   22: 
   23: The NetBSD/mvme68k 1.1 release was fairly basic; running as a diskless
   24: NFS client with no SCSI or parallel printer support, and only two of the
   25: four serial ports working. The boot process was quite long-winded;
   26: transfer a first-stage bootloader using srecords over a serial port from
   27: a second host computer, transfer a second-stage bootloader using TFTP
   28: over the ethernet from the server, finally grab the kernel from the
   29: mvme68k root file-system image on the NFS server.
   30: 
   31: At about this time, [Steve Woodford](http://www.mctavish.co.uk/)
   32: discovered NetBSD/mvme68k and over the coming months added SCSI and
   33: parallel printer support. Booting from SCSI disk was first supported in
   34: the 1.2 release, although the system still had to be installed using the
   35: original netboot method described above due to problems with booting
   36: from tape.
   37: 
   38: Up to and including the [NetBSD 1.2](../../releases/formal-1.2/)
   39: releases, the NetBSD/mvme68k release sets consisted of a couple of
   40: compressed tar files; one for root, the other for /usr. As of [NetBSD
   41: 1.3](../../releases/formal-1.3/), however, the release follows the
   42: official NetBSD convention, including a comprehensive installation
   43: script. Additionally, booting from SCSI tape is now supported, so an NFS
   44: server is no longer required to enable system installation.
   45: """
   46: supported_hardware="""
   47: These are the Motorola Single Board Computers that NetBSD/mvme68k
   48: supports.
   49: 
   50: -   [MVME147 family](#MVME147%20family)
   51: -   [MVME162 family](#MVME162%20family)
   52: -   [MVME167 family](#MVME167%20family)
   53: -   [MVME172 family](#MVME172%20family)
   54: -   [MVME177 family](#MVME177%20family)
   55: 
   56: These are the other supported VMEbus boards that NetBSD/mvme68k
   57: supports.
   58: 
   59: -   [VMEbus RAM Boards](#VMEbus%20RAM%20Boards)
   60: -   [MVME712 Transition Board](#MVME712%20Transition%20Board)
   61: 
   62: MVME147 family
   63: --------------
   64: 
   65: CPU-specific support for the MVME147 family of Single Board Computers
   66: was written by Chuck Cranor.
   67: 
   68: ### Supported Hardware
   69: 
   70: Initially introduced in 1988, the [MVME147
   71: family](http://mcg.motorola.com/cfm/templates/product.cfm?PageID=872&ProductID=1&PageTypeID=1)
   72: is Motorola's oldest Single Board Computer (SBC) product. It was the
   73: first VME board with integrated networking, serial communications, mass
   74: storage interface, and parallel port. This VMEbus SBC is based on the
   75: MC68030 microprocessor.
   76: 
   77: NetBSD/mvme68k runs on Motorola MVME147 boards, with as little as 4MB of
   78: RAM, though *8MB or more is recommended*. ***Note:** A bug in the boot
   79: code for releases \<= 1.3.2 causes problems on 4Mb boards. This has been
   80: fixed in -current and 1.3.3 onwards.* Nearly all of the on-board MVME147
   81: hardware is supported:
   82: -   Battery-backed real-time clock
   83: -   Network interfaces
   84:     -   on-board Lance AM7990 Ethernet
   85: 
   86: -   Parallel port
   87:     -   on-board Centronics style printer port
   88: 
   89: -   SCSI (most disks, tapes, CD-ROMs, etc)
   90:     -   on-board Western Digital wd33c93 SCSI bus interface chip using
   91:         DMA facilities of the board (*asynchronous SCSI only*)
   92: 
   93: -   Serial ports (RS232)
   94:     -   on-board Zilog Z8530 dual serial controller
   95:     -   built-in console and tty01 - tty03, with speeds up to 38400 baud
   96: 
   97: -   VMEbus
   98:     -   all VMEbus boards supported by NetBSD's machine-independent
   99:         VMEbus framework. See /sys/dev/vme for details.
  100: 
  101: The following on-board hardware is not yet directly supported by the
  102: kernel:
  103: 
  104: -   NVRAM (reading and writing)
  105: 
  106: NetBSD/mvme68k also fully supports VMEbus RAM cards in both A24/D32 and
  107: A32/D32 address spaces. *(Note: On MVME147s with \< 16Mb of internal
  108: RAM, access to A24/D32 space is restricted. There is no A24/D32 access
  109: on MVME147s with \>= 16Mb internal RAM.)*
  110: 
  111: ### Known Bugs for the MVME147 port:
  112: 
  113: -   Due to a design flaw on the board, adding VMEbus RAM will actually
  114:     slow the system down! This is caused by the hardware forcibly
  115:     disabling the CPU's cache on VMEbus accesses. Work is in progress in
  116:     NetBSD-current to prioritize memory segments so that faster memory
  117:     is allocated first, in preference to slower memory. This should help
  118:     improve performance of systems using VMEbus RAM.
  119: 
  120: MVME162 family
  121: --------------
  122: 
  123: MVME172 family
  124: --------------
  125: 
  126: Board-specific support for the MVME162 was written by Steve Woodford.
  127: 
  128: ### Supported Hardware
  129: 
  130: The second generation [MVME162
  131: family](http://mcg.motorola.com/cfm/templates/product.cfm?PageID=874&ProductID=2&PageTypeID=1)
  132: and [MVME172
  133: family](http://mcg.motorola.com/cfm/templates/product.cfm?PageID=954&ProductID=4&PageTypeID=1)
  134: Single Board Computers are based on the MC68040/MC68LC040 and
  135: MC68060/MC68LC060 microprocessors. These second generation SBCs offer
  136: faster processors and additional on-board memory capability.
  137: 
  138: NetBSD/mvme68k 1.5 runs on Motorola MVME162 boards, with as little as
  139: 4MB of RAM (with the help of a VMEbus RAM card), though *8MB or more is
  140: recommended*. NetBSD/mvme68k -current runs on Motorola MVME172 boards.
  141: 
  142: The major parts of the on-board MVME162 and MVME172 hardware are
  143: supported:
  144: 
  145: -   Battery-backed real-time clock
  146: -   Network interfaces
  147:     -   on-board Ethernet Intel i82596 controller
  148: 
  149: -   SCSI (most disks, tapes, CD-ROMs, etc)
  150:     -   on-board NCR 53c710 SCSI bus interface chip using DMA facilities
  151:         of the board supporting synchronous transfers up to 10
  152:         Mbytes/second.
  153: 
  154: -   Serial ports (RS232)
  155:     -   on-board Zilog Z85230 communications controllers
  156:     -   built-in console and tty01 - tty03, with speeds up to 38400 baud
  157: 
  158: -   VMEbus
  159:     -   all VMEbus boards supported by NetBSD's machine-independent
  160:         VMEbus framework. See /sys/dev/vme for details.
  161: 
  162: -   MEMC040 (onboard memory controllers)
  163: 
  164: The following on-board hardware is not yet directly supported by the
  165: kernel:
  166: 
  167: -   NVRAM (reading and writing)
  168: -   IP Controllers (Industry Pack sites)
  169: 
  170: ### Known Bugs for the MVME162 MVME172 boards:
  171: 
  172: -   None
  173: 
  174: MVME167 family
  175: --------------
  176: 
  177: MVME177 family
  178: --------------
  179: 
  180: Board-specific support for the MVME167 and MVME177 was written by Steve
  181: Woodford.
  182: 
  183: ### Supported Hardware
  184: 
  185: The second generation [MVME167
  186: family](http://mcg.motorola.com/cfm/templates/product.cfm?PageID=952&ProductID=3&PageTypeID=1)
  187: and [MVME177
  188: family](http://mcg.motorola.com/cfm/templates/product.cfm?PageID=955&ProductID=5&PageTypeID=1)
  189: Single Board Computers are based on the MC68040 and MC68060
  190: microprocessors. These second generation SBC offers a faster processor
  191: and additional on-board memory capability.
  192: 
  193: NetBSD/mvme68k 1.4 runs on Motorola MVME167 boards, with as little as
  194: 8MB of RAM, though *16MB or more is recommended*. NetBSD/mvme68k
  195: -current runs on Motorola MVME177 boards. Nearly all of the on-board
  196: MVME167/MVME177 hardware is supported:
  197: 
  198: -   Battery-backed real-time clock
  199: -   Network interfaces
  200:     -   on-board Ethernet Intel i82596 controller
  201: 
  202: -   Parallel port
  203:     -   on-board Centronics style printer port
  204: 
  205: -   SCSI (most disks, tapes, CD-ROMs, etc)
  206:     -   on-board NCR 53c710 SCSI bus interface chip using DMA facilities
  207:         of the board supporting synchronous transfers up to 10
  208:         Mbytes/second.
  209: 
  210: -   Serial ports (RS232)
  211:     -   on-board Cirrus Logic CD2401 communications controller
  212:     -   built-in console and tty01 - tty03, with speeds up to 38400 baud
  213: 
  214: -   VMEbus
  215:     -   all VMEbus boards supported by NetBSD's machine-independent
  216:         VMEbus framework. See /sys/dev/vme for details.
  217: 
  218: -   MEMC040 (onboard memory controllers)
  219: 
  220: The following on-board hardware is not yet directly supported by the
  221: kernel:
  222: 
  223: -   NVRAM (reading and writing)
  224: 
  225: ### Known Bugs for the MVME167 and MVME177 boards:
  226: 
  227: -   None
  228: 
  229: VMEbus RAM Boards
  230: -----------------
  231: 
  232: Any VMEbus RAM board which does not require software to set it up should
  233: work with MVME147 cards. At this time, VMEbus RAM boards are not
  234: officially supported with other MVME boards.
  235: 
  236: These VMEbus RAM boards are known to work the NetBSD/mvme68k.
  237: 
  238: *The list of VMEbus RAM boards known to work is currently under
  239: development. If you have a VMEbus RAM board that works with
  240: NetBSD/mvme68k please send the model number to
  241: [www@NetBSD.org](mailto:www@NetBSD.org). It will be added to the list.*
  242: 
  243: MVME712 Transition Board
  244: ------------------------
  245: 
  246: These transition boards are compatible with the MVME147, MVME167 and
  247: MVME177 family of single board computers.
  248: 
  249: -   MVME712A
  250: -   MVME712B
  251: -   MVME712-012
  252: -   MVME712AM
  253: -   MVME712M
  254: -   MVME712-013
  255: 
  256: General Comments
  257: ----------------
  258: 
  259: These are some general comments that apply to NetBSD/mvme68k.
  260: 
  261: -   Application code for any m68k-based NetBSD platform will run on all
  262:     the mvme68k single-board computers without change.
  263: -   If necessary, a single kernel image can be built which will boot on
  264:     all the MVME models.
  265: 
  266: 
  267: Boot options
  268: ------------
  269: 
  270: -   Supported:
  271: 
  272:     -   disk
  273:     -   network
  274:     -   tape
  275: 
  276: -   Unupported:
  277: 
  278:     -   CD-ROM *(Motorola firmware limitation)*
  279: 
  280: """
  281: additional="""
  282: ### General Questions
  283: 
  284: -   [How to handle a dead nvram battery](#dead_nvram)
  285: -   [What are the jumpers on the backplane](#bus_jumpers)
  286: -   [My newly installed MVME167 crashes on
  287:     reboot](#mvme167_crash_on_boot)
  288: 
  289: ### Other sources of information
  290: 
  291: -   [Other information on NetBSD.org](#other_info_nbsd)
  292: 
  293: * * * * *
  294: 
  295: ### General Questions
  296: 
  297: #### How to handle a dead nvram battery ([top](#general))
  298: 
  299: They are not 'mvme' specific chips, in that there's nothing which needs
  300: to be pre-programmed to make them work with a 147. What you need to do,
  301: both with a new nvram, or one with a flat battery is to press the
  302: abort/reset buttons in the following order to force 147bug to
  303: re-initialise the nvram:
  304: 
  305: -   Press and hold abort
  306: 
  307: -   Press reset, while still holding abort
  308: 
  309: -   Release reset
  310: 
  311: -   5 seconds later (or when 147bug prompt appears) release abort
  312: 
  313: You should now set the ethernet MAC address using the **lsad** command.
  314: The address is on a label on the inside of the front panel. Only the
  315: last five digits need to be entered. Next, use the **mm** command to set
  316: the 32-bit word at 0xfffe0764 to zero.
  317: 
  318: #### What are the jumpers on the backplane ([top](#general))
  319: 
  320: The jumpers on the backplane are for Bus Grant and Interrupt
  321: Acknowledge. Some VMEbus boards, like disk controllers, do their own
  322: VMEbus I/O instead of using DMA from the CPU. The I/O board requests
  323: control of the VMEbus, the arbiter on the CPU board releases control of
  324: the VMEbus, and then the arbiter on the CPU sends a Bus Grant signal
  325: down the backplane.
  326: 
  327: There are only 4 Bus Grant levels, and you can have several boards, on
  328: the same Bus Grant level. The Bus Grant signal daisy-chains down the
  329: backplane through each I/O board. If you have an empty slot you break
  330: the daisy-chain.
  331: 
  332: Backplane manufacturers put jumper pins next to the connectors so you
  333: can jumper across empty slots. Unfortunately the jumpers may be to the
  334: right or left of a slot depending on the manufacturer.
  335: 
  336: You may also find that some VMEbus boards don't pass on daisy-chain
  337: signals that they don't use. This means that you may have to leave
  338: jumpers on even when a board is in a slot.
  339: 
  340: If the boards are side-by-side without an empty slot between the CPU and
  341: the VMEbus boards you may not need any jumpers. That might be worth a
  342: try.
  343: 
  344: #### My newly installed MVME167 crashes on reboot ([top](#general))
  345: 
  346: This is most likely caused by the NetBSD kernel image loading over the
  347: top of 167Bug's workspace in DRAM. The fix is simple; remove jumper 'J1'
  348: near the top/front of the MVME167 board. This tells 167Bug to use
  349: another area of memory for its workspace.
  350: 
  351: """
  352: 
  353: ]]
  354: [[!tag tier2port]]

CVSweb for NetBSD wikisrc <wikimaster@NetBSD.org> software: FreeBSD-CVSweb