File:  [NetBSD Developer Wiki] / wikisrc / ports / hp300faq.mdwn
Revision 1.2: download - view: text, annotated - select for diffs
Sat Dec 22 14:36:17 2012 UTC (8 years, 8 months ago) by mspo
Branches: MAIN
CVS tags: HEAD
add hp700 and attempt some html fixes on sun3

    1: NetBSD/hp300 Frequently Asked Questions
    2: =======================================
    3: 
    4: ### General Questions
    5: 
    6: -   [My screen went black after some initial bootrom
    7:     messages](#blackscreen)
    8: -   [Can NetBSD/hp300 boot across the network?](#netboot)
    9: -   [How can I change Ethernet media types on 4xx models?](#ether-port)
   10: -   [What TERM type is needed for the console?](#hp300h)
   11: -   [What is the situation with X11 on the hp300?](#x11)
   12: -   [Models 345 and 425e having problems with internal hard
   13:     drives](#int.hd)
   14: -   [What are the Model 362 and 382?](#model362-382)
   15: -   [What does 'UNEXPECTED USE OF FFFFFFC4' mean?](#unexpected_use_of)
   16: 
   17: ### Boot ROM Information
   18: 
   19: -   [What commands does the HP Boot ROM understand?](#bootrom)
   20: -   [What order does the Boot ROM use to search for bootable
   21:     devices?](#bootsearch)
   22: -   [Switching your Series 400 machine from Domain to "HP-UX Compatible
   23:     Boot Mode"](#domain)
   24: -   [Where could I get a more recent Boot ROM for my 400s or
   25:     400t?](#bootrom2)
   26: 
   27: ### Serial Port Information
   28: 
   29: -   [What are the different types of serial ports, and how do I access
   30:     them?](#serialdefs)
   31: -   [Setting up a serial console on a 98561, 98562, 98626, 98628, 98642,
   32:     or 98644](#serialconsole)
   33: -   [Setting up serial console on a Model 340](#serialconsole340)
   34: -   [Setting up serial console on a Series 400 machine or a 345, 362,
   35:     375, 380, 382, or 385](#serialconsole400)
   36: -   [How do I build the cable to get at the hidden serial ports on a
   37:     Series 400 machine?](#serialsplit)
   38: -   [Does my System Interface Board really need a special DB9 serial
   39:     cable?](#serialdca)
   40: 
   41: ### Other sources of information
   42: 
   43: -   [Other sources of information](#)
   44: 
   45: * * * * *
   46: 
   47: ### General Questions
   48: 
   49: #### My screen went black after some initial bootrom messages ([top](#))
   50: 
   51: This means your framebuffer is not supported. Hook up a serial terminal,
   52: 9600 bps, 8 bits, no parity, 1 stop bit, xon/xoff flow control.
   53: 
   54: Contact `<port-hp300@NetBSD.org>`{.email} if you'd like to work on
   55: writing a driver for your framebuffer.
   56: 
   57: #### Can NetBSD/hp300 boot across the network? ([top](#))
   58: 
   59: HP 9000/300-series workstations support network booting with Boot ROM
   60: Revision B or later. (This includes any Boot ROM with a numeric
   61: revision). The HP Boot ROM uses the **HP Remote Maintainance Protocol**
   62: to download the boot code from the server. The server must run a daemon
   63: capable of responding to HP RMP boot requests. If your server runs
   64: NetBSD, it has
   65: *[rbootd(8)](http://netbsd.gw.com/cgi-bin/man-cgi?rbootd+8+NetBSD-6.0+i386)*
   66: in the base system. If your server runs another OS, like Linux or
   67: Solaris, you can try [YAMAMORI Takenori's *sun-rbootd*
   68: package](http://www15.big.or.jp/~yamamori/sun/netbsd-hp_e.html).
   69: 
   70: To set up your NetBSD/hp300 workstation, follow the
   71: *[diskless(8)](http://netbsd.gw.com/cgi-bin/man-cgi?diskless+8+NetBSD-6.0+i386)*
   72: man page. For more detailed instructions, see the [Diskless
   73: HOW-TO](../../docs/network/netboot/) and its [Setting up the rbootd
   74: server section](../../docs/network/netboot/rbootd/).
   75: 
   76: #### How can I change Ethernet media types on 4xx models? ([top](#))
   77: 
   78: Series 400 machines have two Ethernet media types built into the
   79: motherboard. You may only use one at a time. When your Series 400
   80: workstation goes through the self-test when powered on or rebooted, it
   81: will say one of the following:
   82: 
   83: ~~~~ {.programlisting}
   84: HP98643 (LAN) at 21, AUI
   85: HP98643 (LAN) at 21, Thin
   86: ~~~~
   87: 
   88: If the wrong type of network is selected, you will need to change the
   89: Ethernet port. You will need to open the case (4XXt, 4XXdl, 4XXe) or
   90: remove the motherboard (4XXs) to access the jumper. Be sure to use
   91: static-prevention measures, as you could easily fry your motherboard
   92: from carelessness. If you are uncomfortable with this, ask a friend who
   93: is aware of these issues. There is a block of 8 jumpers at the rear of
   94: the motherboard, labeled AUI/Thin. You will need to put the jumpers in
   95: the position necessary for your type of Ethernet.
   96: 
   97: #### What `TERM`{.code} type is needed for the console? ([top](#))
   98: 
   99: If you're using a local console on NetBSD 5.x or prior, and you're
  100: running csh or tcsh, you'll need to make sure you run:
  101: 
  102: ~~~~ {.programlisting}
  103: setenv TERM hp300h
  104: ~~~~
  105: 
  106: Otherwise many things won't work, including vi.
  107: 
  108: On NetBSD -current with wscons support (including future 6.0 and later
  109: releases), use `wsvt25`{.code} for `TERM`{.code} environment variable as
  110: other wscons ports.
  111: 
  112: #### What is the situation with X11 on the hp300? ([top](#))
  113: 
  114: NetBSD 5.x includes all X11R6 clients, but there is no functional
  115: server.
  116: 
  117: NetBSD 6.0 (and later releases) will have Xorg server based on generic
  118: wsfb driver.
  119: 
  120: #### Models 345 and 425e having problems with internal hard drives ([top](#))
  121: 
  122: The SCSI cable in these models is **not** notched to specify which way
  123: it should be plugged in. The symptom is being unable to boot due to a
  124: SCSI register test failing. If you are *certain* that your hard drive
  125: works properly on another machine, then flip one end of the SCSI cable
  126: over.
  127: 
  128: The only other models that accept internal hard drives are the 362, 382,
  129: 4XXt, and 4XXs which do not have this uncertainty in cabling.
  130: 
  131: #### What are the Model 362 and 382? ([top](#))
  132: 
  133: These models were designed as instrument controllers, unlike the rest of
  134: the Series 300 and Series 400 systems which were intended as
  135: workstations or servers. The 362 and 382 are 19" rackmount units with
  136: very PC-like properties.
  137: 
  138: They have 72 pin SIMM slots (with parity on 362, with ECC on 382), two
  139: SCSI drive bays (usually HD and SCSI floppy), serial, parallel (not
  140: currently supported by NetBSD), HPIB, sound, HP-HIL, one DIO-I slot, and
  141: a VGA-style video connector. The 362 has 2 SIMM slots and you can
  142: install SIMMs one at a time. The 382 has 4 SIMM slots and you must
  143: install in pairs. Both models accept only 1, 4, and 8 MB SIMMs.
  144: 
  145: 382 has three serial ports using the Utility Chip like the Series 400
  146: models. Only one is accessible unless you build or buy the [special
  147: cable](#serialsplit).
  148: 
  149: 362 has only 640x480 8bpp VGA like graphics chip. 382 was shipped with
  150: three different graphics chipsets (all 8 bpp): 640x480 at 60 Hz,
  151: 1024x768 at 75 Hz, and 1280x1024 at 72 Hz. These on-board graphics are
  152: not supported by NetBSD 5.x and prior, but you can install a DIO-I
  153: framebuffer and disable the on-board video (there's a jumper on the
  154: motherboard).
  155: 
  156: Since the system was designed as a controller, Ethernet and external
  157: SCSI are optional and are in the form of a small card that plugs into
  158: the motherboard. The card is roughly the size of two PCMCIA cards
  159: stacked together. You can, of course, use a DIO-I Ethernet card.
  160: 
  161: Oddly, the motherboard is the same shape and size as a DIO-II card and
  162: has DIO-II connectors. Jarkko Teppo reports that you can even put the
  163: motherboard into a normal DIO-II chassis and use it as a "normal" Series
  164: 300 system. The only problem he encountered was the physical size of the
  165: Ethernet option. See [Jarkko Teppo's
  166: report](http://mail-index.NetBSD.org/port-hp300/1999/07/16/0000.html)
  167: for more info.
  168: 
  169: #### What does 'UNEXPECTED USE OF FFFFFFC4' mean? ([top](#))
  170: 
  171: This is the output of one of a set of temporary, informational only,
  172: exception handlers installed by the Boot ROM before an OS has been
  173: loaded. The address printed varies depending on the type of exception.
  174: The most likely cause here is trying to boot a kernel that is
  175: incompatible with the hardware. You will get something like this, for
  176: example, if you attempt to boot an HP-UX 7.0 or earlier kernel on a
  177: 68040 machine (which requires at least 7.05). If you're going to install
  178: NetBSD, you probably don't need to worry about this message, though it
  179: is possible (but unlikely) that it indicates hardware trouble or a
  180: corrupt bootloader.
  181: 
  182: * * * * *
  183: 
  184: ### Boot ROM Information
  185: 
  186: #### What commands does the HP Boot ROM understand? ([top](#))
  187: 
  188: All the early hp300 Boot ROMs are very primitive and only allow a few
  189: simple operations. You can only interact with it after it is first
  190: powered on -- if you reboot the machine, it will ignore anything you
  191: type and start loading the same OS you previously booted.
  192: 
  193: At any time after it recognizes the keyboard, while it is doing its self
  194: test or searching for a bootable system, you can hit `reset`{.code} to
  195: return it to a cold-boot configuration. On HIL keyboards, this is
  196: `<control>-<shift>-break`{.code}, where `break`{.code} is the key in the
  197: upper left (where escape is on sane keyboards). There is no equivalent
  198: over serial terminal -- you'll need to power-cycle your machine.
  199: 
  200: After it beeps (i.e. recognizes the HIL keyboard), press
  201: `<return>`{.code} twice to get the list of bootable devices. To perform
  202: simple hardware checks, hit `<control>-C`{.code} before it starts
  203: booting an OS. You can then type `T`{.code} to perform an extended self
  204: test or `L`{.code} to perform the extended self test infinitely until it
  205: finds a fatal error or `L`{.code} is typed again.
  206: 
  207: The newer HP Boot ROM, present on Series 400 machines and some of the
  208: later 300s (345, 362, 375, 380, 382, 385) is capable of a little bit
  209: more. To select which device to boot from, press `<return>`{.code} once,
  210: after it beeps twice (i.e. recognizes the HIL keyboard). To get to a
  211: configuration and test menu, press:
  212: 
  213: ~~~~ {.programlisting}
  214:  C <return>
  215: ~~~~
  216: 
  217: This will allow you to configure interrupt levels, select codes, and
  218: serial console properties. You can also hit `<control>-C`{.code} to get
  219: to a menu of extended tests with several fancy options.
  220: 
  221: For more information, Michael Wolfson has scanned in parts of the [HP
  222: Apollo 9000 Series 400 HP-UX Owner's
  223: Guide](http://www.nosflow.com/~mw/hp300/400.manual/), which has some
  224: good information on this topic. Also, the [HP Computer
  225: Museum](http://www.hpmuseum.net/index.php) has various useful manuals
  226: and informations for many HP 9000 models.
  227: 
  228: #### What order does the Boot ROM use to search for bootable devices? ([top](#))
  229: 
  230: From the *Configuration Reference Manual*, 98561-90020:
  231: 
  232: **Revision A Boot ROM Specifications**
  233: 
  234: The boot ROM can load a ROM system or a file from a LIF or SRM "SYSTEM"
  235: type file having a name of the form SYSa, where "a" is typically an
  236: ASCII letter, but may be any character legal in a file name.
  237: 
  238: ROM systems are assigned a single letter ID (only "B", for BASIC, is
  239: presently supported on Series 300).
  240: 
  241: All system files found are assigned an ID of the form "nna", where "a"
  242: is either the same letter "a" mentioned above (if an ASCII letter), or
  243: "Z" (if not an ASCII letter). "nn" is a number of the form " 1" to "99"
  244: denoting the order of occurrence of systems which result in the same ID
  245: letter "a". The range of system IDs is " 1A" to "99Z".
  246: 
  247: The boot ROM loads the first system found unless characters (other than
  248: that system's ID) are typed on the boot control keyboard (see below).
  249: The search order used by the boot ROM is:
  250: 
  251: -   For select codes 7 thru 31: disc or tape (HPIB) at bus address 0,
  252:     unit 0, volume 0
  253: 
  254: -   SRM at select code 21, node 0, volume 8, "/SYSTEMS" directory
  255: 
  256: -   98259A Bubble system at select code 30
  257: 
  258: -   98255 EPROM "disc"-type system at unit 0 (lowest address of all
  259:     98255s installed)
  260: 
  261: -   ROM systems (from lowest to highest ROM address)
  262: 
  263: -   For select codes 0 thru 31, bus addresses 0 to 7, units 0 to 16,
  264:     volumes 0 to 7: all remaining discs or tapes (HPIB)
  265: 
  266: -   For select codes 0 thru 31, nodes 1 thru 62, volumes 1 to 50: any
  267:     other SRM system files in "/SYSTEMS" directories
  268: 
  269: -   For select codes 0 thru 29, and 31: remaining 98255 Bubble systems
  270: 
  271: -   Remaining 98255 "disc"-type EPROM units.
  272: 
  273: Revision B and later also support booting over the network, using a
  274: 98643 card or built-in Ethernet. For older systems, the best choice is
  275: to make your boot drive on HPIB at address 0. Remember, you'll need to
  276: capitalize the letters.
  277: 
  278: **Newer Boot ROM Search Order**
  279: 
  280: The newer machines (Models 345, 362, 375, 380, 382, 385, and Series 400)
  281: have a different boot order. From *HP Apollo 9000 Series 400 HP-UX
  282: Owner's Guide*, A1630-90006:
  283: 
  284: > The Scan for Systems selection searches mass storage devices for an
  285: > operating system to boot. The first mass storage device found with an
  286: > HP-UX Compatible operating system on it boots. Mass storage devices
  287: > are searched by the priority shown in this table.
  288: 
  289: Priority Level
  290: 
  291: Device
  292: 
  293: Select Code
  294: 
  295: Bus Address
  296: 
  297: Unit Number
  298: 
  299: 1
  300: 
  301: SCSI
  302: 
  303: 0-31
  304: 
  305: 7-5
  306: 
  307: 0
  308: 
  309: 2
  310: 
  311: HP-IB
  312: 
  313: 0-31
  314: 
  315: 7-5
  316: 
  317: 0
  318: 
  319: 3
  320: 
  321: SRM
  322: 
  323: 14
  324: 
  325: N/A
  326: 
  327: N/A
  328: 
  329: 4
  330: 
  331: LAN
  332: 
  333: 21
  334: 
  335: N/A
  336: 
  337: N/A
  338: 
  339: 5
  340: 
  341: Bubble RAM
  342: 
  343: 30
  344: 
  345: N/A
  346: 
  347: N/A
  348: 
  349: 6
  350: 
  351: EEPROM
  352: 
  353: N/A
  354: 
  355: N/A
  356: 
  357: 0
  358: 
  359: 7
  360: 
  361: SCSI
  362: 
  363: 0-31
  364: 
  365: 4-0
  366: 
  367: 0
  368: 
  369: 8
  370: 
  371: HP-IB
  372: 
  373: 0-31
  374: 
  375: 4-0
  376: 
  377: 0
  378: 
  379: 9
  380: 
  381: SRM
  382: 
  383: Other than 14
  384: 
  385: N/A
  386: 
  387: N/A
  388: 
  389: 10
  390: 
  391: LAN
  392: 
  393: Other than 21
  394: 
  395: N/A
  396: 
  397: N/A
  398: 
  399: 11
  400: 
  401: Bubble RAM
  402: 
  403: Other than 30
  404: 
  405: N/A
  406: 
  407: N/A
  408: 
  409: 12
  410: 
  411: EEPROM
  412: 
  413: Other than 0
  414: 
  415: N/A
  416: 
  417: 0
  418: 
  419: So, for these newer systems, your best bet is to make your boot drive a
  420: SCSI drive at address 6 (7 is the system controller on the motherboard).
  421: 
  422: It is also possible to configure the Boot ROM to default to a specific
  423: device from the configuration menu.
  424: 
  425: #### Switching your Series 400 machine from Domain to "HP-UX Compatible Boot Mode" ([top](#))
  426: 
  427: This step is necessary, since NetBSD can only boot a Series 400 machine
  428: when it's set up in "HP-UX Compatible Boot Mode". If, when you power on
  429: your machine, it does **not** present a menu as follows, then you need
  430: to follow the instructions below:
  431: 
  432: ~~~~ {.programlisting}
  433: Copyright 1990,                         
  434: Hewlett-Packard Company.                
  435: All Rights Reserved.                    
  436:                                         
  437: BOOTROM  Series 400  Rev. 1.1           
  438: MD12 REV 1.2 1990/08/07.14:27:08        
  439: MC68030 Processor                       
  440: MC68882 Coprocessor                     
  441: Configuration EEPROM                    
  442: Utility Chip at 41                      
  443: HP-HIL.Keyboard
  444: [...]
  445: ~~~~
  446: 
  447: First, you'll need either a Domain keyboard or a HIL keyboard (the Boot
  448: ROM knows how to use either, even if NetBSD doesn't yet). Now, put your
  449: machine into "service mode". For a 4XXs, there's a toggle switch on the
  450: back of the machine (near the top). For a 4XXt or 4XXdl, there's a green
  451: button on the front, behind the silly door. For a 425e, there's a toggle
  452: switch on the back of the machine (in the middle). Once you're in
  453: "service mode", the other green LED will light up. Reset the machine.
  454: You may then need to hit return to get the Domain boot prompt. At that
  455: prompt, you can type `H`{.code} to get a list of available commands. You
  456: need to type the following things to convert to HP-UX mode:
  457: 
  458: ~~~~ {.programlisting}
  459: CF
  460: 2
  461: 2
  462: P
  463: E
  464: ~~~~
  465: 
  466: [This](domain.commands.html) is the full procedure captured from a
  467: serial console.
  468: 
  469: Be sure to turn **off** "service mode" when you're done. I found it
  470: prevented me from selecting which device I wanted to boot from.
  471: 
  472: #### Where could I get a more recent Boot ROM for my 400s or 400t? ([top](#))
  473: 
  474: Michael Wolfson has images of the HP 425/433 Boot ROM in HP-UX mode.
  475: This is necessary when upgrading a 400 to a 425/433
  476: 
  477: See [The fatmac HP9000/300
  478: guide](http://www.nosflow.com/~mw/hp300/upgrade/) for instructions on
  479: upgrading.
  480: 
  481: * * * * *
  482: 
  483: ### Serial Port Information
  484: 
  485: #### What are the different types of serial ports, and how do I access them? ([top](#))
  486: 
  487: NetBSD -current has switched to using the
  488: [com(4)](http://netbsd.gw.com/cgi-bin/man-cgi?com+4+NetBSD-6.0+i386)
  489: driver for [dca](http://man.NetBSD.org/man/dca+4.hp300+NetBSD-1.6) and
  490: [apci](http://man.NetBSD.org/man/apci+4.hp300+NetBSD-1.6) devices. This
  491: covers all built-in serial ports and some DIO serial interfaces. With
  492: this change, the device files have changed. All DCA and APCI serial
  493: ports are `/dev/ttyC[0123]`{.code} and all DCM serial ports are
  494: `/dev/ttyM[0123]`{.code}.
  495: 
  496: The APCI device (found on-board Series 400 systems) is a four-port
  497: serial mux interface. The first port connects directly with the Domain
  498: keyboard. The second port is accessible using normal DB25 pinouts and
  499: acts as the serial console (when set). The remaining two ports require
  500: use of a break-out cable.
  501: 
  502: Additionally, see the [NetBSD Serial Port
  503: Primer](../../docs/Hardware/Misc/serial.html) for information on the
  504: wiring and pinouts of various serial cables.
  505: 
  506: *device name*
  507: 
  508: *location*
  509: 
  510: *pre-2.0 device file*
  511: 
  512: *max speed*
  513: 
  514: *hardware handshaking*
  515: 
  516: *FIFO*
  517: 
  518: *serial console*
  519: 
  520: *comments*
  521: 
  522: [com](http://man.NetBSD.org/man/com+4.hp300+NetBSD-current)0
  523: *(formerly `dca0`{.code})*
  524: 
  525: built-in
  526: 
  527: /dev/tty0
  528: 
  529: 19200
  530: 
  531: no
  532: 
  533: no
  534: 
  535: DIP switches
  536: 
  537: 318, 319, 320, 330, 340, 350, 360, 370
  538: 
  539: located on Human/System Interface board, requires [special
  540: cable](dca.cable.html)
  541: 
  542: [com](http://man.NetBSD.org/man/com+4.hp300+NetBSD-current)0
  543: *(formerly `dca0`{.code})*
  544: 
  545: built-in
  546: 
  547: /dev/tty0
  548: 
  549: 38400
  550: 
  551: yes
  552: 
  553: yes
  554: 
  555: config Boot ROM
  556: 
  557: 345, 362, 375, 380, 382, 385, 400 Series *(except 425e)*
  558: 
  559: located on motherboard
  560: 
  561: [com](http://man.NetBSD.org/man/com+4.hp300+NetBSD-current)1
  562: [com](http://man.NetBSD.org/man/com+4.hp300+NetBSD-current)2
  563: *(formerly `apciN`{.code})*
  564: 
  565: built-in
  566: 
  567: /dev/ttya0 /dev/ttya1
  568: 
  569: 19200
  570: 
  571: yes
  572: 
  573: no
  574: 
  575: no, (425e: yes)
  576: 
  577: 382, 400 Series
  578: 
  579: requires [break-out cable](serial.splitter.html)
  580: 
  581: [com](http://man.NetBSD.org/man/com+4.hp300+NetBSD-current)N
  582: *(formerly `dcaN`{.code})*
  583: 
  584: 98644A DIO-I card
  585: 
  586: /dev/ttyN
  587: 
  588: 19200
  589: 
  590: yes
  591: 
  592: no
  593: 
  594: DIP switches
  595: 
  596: hardware handshaking only for transmit
  597: 
  598: [com](http://man.NetBSD.org/man/com+4.hp300+NetBSD-current)N
  599: *(formerly `dcaN`{.code})*
  600: 
  601: 98626A DIO-I card
  602: 
  603: /dev/ttyN
  604: 
  605: 19200
  606: 
  607: yes
  608: 
  609: no
  610: 
  611: DIP switches
  612: 
  613: hardware handshaking only for transmit
  614: 
  615: [dcm](http://man.NetBSD.org/man/dcm+4.hp300+NetBSD-current)N
  616: 
  617: 98642A DIO-I card
  618: 
  619: /dev/tty0[0-3]
  620: 
  621: 19200
  622: 
  623: yes
  624: 
  625: yes, 128/16 bytes
  626: 
  627: DIP switches
  628: 
  629: Only port 0 has flow control, only port 1 does console Uses
  630: [RJ-11](dcmpinouts.html) jacks
  631: 
  632: [dcm](http://man.NetBSD.org/man/dcm+4.hp300+NetBSD-current)N
  633: [dcm](http://man.NetBSD.org/man/dcm+4.hp300+NetBSD-current)N+1
  634: 
  635: 98638 DIO-II card
  636: 
  637: /dev/tty0[0-3], /dev/tty0[4-7]
  638: 
  639: 19200
  640: 
  641: yes
  642: 
  643: yes, 127/16 bytes
  644: 
  645: no
  646: 
  647: Appears to kernel as two 98642 boards
  648: 
  649: [dcl](http://man.NetBSD.org/man/dcl+4.hp300+NetBSD-current)N,
  650: *(not supported)*
  651: 
  652: 98628A DIO-I card
  653: 
  654: /dev/ttyN
  655: 
  656: 19200
  657: 
  658: yes
  659: 
  660: yes, 256 bytes
  661: 
  662: jumper
  663: 
  664: weird centronics connector goes to normal db25
  665: 
  666: #### Setting up a serial console on a 98561, 98562, 98626, 98628, 98642, or 98644 ([top](#))
  667: 
  668: Turn off power to your system before removing any cards. Remove the card
  669: with the serial interface.
  670: 
  671: -   **`98561-66530`{.code}** (Human Interface)
  672: 
  673:     Locate the bank of 4 DIP switches, One of them should be labeled
  674:     REM, Set the switch to ?
  675: 
  676: -   **`98562`{.code}** (System Interface)
  677: 
  678:     Locate the middle bank of DIP switches (4 switches), The third
  679:     switch is labeled REM, Set the switch to one (depress the end
  680:     labeled one), *Note: you need a [special cable](dca.cable.html)*
  681: 
  682: -   **`98626`{.code}** (dca)
  683: 
  684:     Locate the jumper by the two banks of DIP switches, Remove the
  685:     jumper
  686: 
  687: -   **`98628`{.code}** (dcl)
  688: 
  689:     Locate the bank of DIP switches by the card-edge connector, The last
  690:     switch (labeled 7) is the remote switch, Set the switch to zero
  691:     (depress the end labeled zero)
  692: 
  693: -   **`98642`{.code}** (dcm)
  694: 
  695:     Locate the 8 DIP switches, The first switch (labeled 1) is the
  696:     remote switch, Set the switch to one (slide the bump to one). *Note:
  697:     According to the manual, the Boot ROM on older machines does not
  698:     know how to use this for console, but NetBSD (and HP-UX) will, so
  699:     you won't see anything until the bootloader loads.*
  700: 
  701: -   **`98644`{.code}** (dca)
  702: 
  703:     Locate the 10 DIP switches, The last switch (labeled 1) is the
  704:     remote switch. Set the switch to one (depress the end labeled one)
  705: 
  706: Now, reinsert the card and power on your machine. All console messages
  707: will be sent over the serial port at 9600 bps, 8 bits, no parity, 1 stop
  708: bit. Theoretically, you should be using a null-modem cable, but I found
  709: that for my 98562, I needed a non-null modem cable.
  710: 
  711: #### Setting up serial console on a Model 340 ([top](#))
  712: 
  713: Turn off power to your system. There are four DIP switches visible
  714: through the rear panel, flip the third switch from the left to one. Turn
  715: on your system.
  716: 
  717: Now, all console messages will be sent over the serial port at 9600 bps,
  718: 8 bits, no parity, 1 stop bit.
  719: 
  720: #### Setting up serial console on a Series 400 machine or a 345, 362, 375, 380, 382, or 385 ([top](#))
  721: 
  722: This procedure does not work on the 425e, since it does not support
  723: serial console in the Boot ROM.
  724: 
  725: Wait until your system beeps twice (this is to let you know it's
  726: recognized the keyboard). Type `C<return>`{.code} and wait until the
  727: configuration menu shows up. Then type in the following set of commands:
  728: 
  729: ~~~~ {.programlisting}
  730: 1
  731: 5
  732: 3
  733: R
  734: X
  735: N
  736: ~~~~
  737: 
  738: [This](serialconsole.html) is the full procedure captured from a serial
  739: console on my 400s. [This](serialconsole380.html) is the procedure
  740: captured from a serial console on Ian Clark's 380 (and should be the
  741: same on any 345, 362 375, 380, 382, or 385). The number you type for
  742: selecting the serial settings in the menu might be different on 362 or
  743: 382 models without the optional Ethernet.
  744: 
  745: Now, your machine will reset and then send all console messages over the
  746: serial port at 9600 bps, 8 bits, no parity, 1 stop bit. Use a null-modem
  747: cable.
  748: 
  749: If you want to convert from serial console to monitor/keyboard console,
  750: follow the same procedure, except type `L`{.code} instead of `R`{.code}.
  751: 
  752: You may also *temporarily* override this setting by typing
  753: `L<return>`{.code} or `R<return>`{.code} after your system beeps twice
  754: and recognizes the keyboard. This will work even if you have a Domain
  755: keyboard.
  756: 
  757: Since the hardware takes care of this console, you do **not** add an
  758: entry for the console in `/etc/ttys`{.code}. That would be bad.
  759: 
  760: #### How do I build the cable to get at the hidden serial ports on a Series 400 machine? ([top](#))
  761: 
  762: Build the funky [cable](serial.splitter.html). Otherwise, just using a
  763: normal DB25 serial cable will work fine if you only want one serial
  764: port.
  765: 
  766: #### Does my System Interface Board really need a special DB9 serial cable? ([top](#))
  767: 
  768: Yes. A normal DB9\<-\>DB25 adaptor will *not* work. This cable is HP
  769: part number [98561-61604](dca.cable.html).
  770: 
  771: * * * * *
  772: 
  773: ### Other sources of information
  774: 
  775: #### Other sources of information ([top](#other-info))
  776: 
  777: -   [HP9000/300 hardware
  778:     FAQ](http://www.nosflow.com/~mw/hp300/FAQ/rossspon/hp300faq.htm) -
  779:     maintained by Ross Sponholtz.
  780: 
  781: -   [The fatmac HP9000/300 guide](http://www.nosflow.com/~mw/hp300/) -
  782:     made available by Michael Wolfson
  783: 
  784: -   [hp300 series HW brain dump by Mike
  785:     Hibler](http://mail-index.NetBSD.org/port-hp300/1994/12/15/0007.html)
  786: 
  787: -   [HP Computer Museum](http://www.hpmuseum.net/index.php)
  788: 
  789: -   [Diskless NetBSD HOW-TO](../../docs/network/netboot/)
  790: 
  791: -   [NetBSD Serial Port Primer](../../docs/Hardware/Misc/serial.html)
  792: 
  793: -   [port-hp300 mail list](../../mailinglists/#port-hp300) - if you have
  794:     any additional questions please subscribe.
  795: 
  796: -   [General NetBSD Documentation](../../docs/) - questions not specific
  797:     to NetBSD/hp300.

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