Diff for /wikisrc/ports/evbarm/raspberry_pi.mdwn between versions 1.112 and 1.121

version 1.112, 2018/11/09 01:26:42 version 1.121, 2019/09/02 20:48:37
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 [[!meta title="NetBSD/evbarm on Raspberry Pi"]]  [[!meta title="NetBSD/evbarm on Raspberry Pi"]]
   
 This page attempts to document and coordinate efforts towards NetBSD/evbarm on [Raspberry Pi](http://www.raspberrypi.org).  All [board variants](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raspberry_Pi#Specifications) are supported.  We use e.g. "RPI2" to refer to "Raspberry Pi 2" to save precious bytes on this page.  This page describes the NetBSD/evbarm port on [Raspberry Pi](http://www.raspberrypi.org) hardware.  All [board variants](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raspberry_Pi#Specifications) earlier than the RPI4 are believed supported, and specific boards known to work are listed.  We use e.g. "RPI2" to refer to "Raspberry Pi 2" to save precious bytes on this page.  This web page is 32-bit (aarch32) centric, as that has been until mid-2018 the only approach.
   
 Initial, limited, Raspberry Pi support was introduced in NetBSD 6.0.  NetBSD 7.0 adds complete support for the board, along with introducing support for the quad-core Raspberry Pi 2 board.  Raspberry Pi 3 support was added for NetBSD 8, and backported to NetBSD 7 in July of 2017.  (This page assumes those using NetBSD 7 are using 7.2 or later, but note that everyone uses 8 or -current.)  Initial, limited, Raspberry Pi support was introduced in NetBSD 6.0.  NetBSD 7.0 adds complete support for the board, along with introducing support for the quad-core Raspberry Pi 2 board.  Raspberry Pi 3 support was added for NetBSD 8, and backported to NetBSD 7 in July of 2017.  (This page assumes those using NetBSD 7 are using 7.2 or later, but note that everyone uses 8 or -current.)
   
   In mid-2018, -current gained support for 64-bit ARM (aarch64) support.  This will be in NetBSD 9.
   
 [[images/raspberrypi.jpg]]  [[images/raspberrypi.jpg]]
   
 [[!toc levels=2]]  [[!toc levels=2]]
Line 36  Initial, limited, Raspberry Pi support w Line 38  Initial, limited, Raspberry Pi support w
  - RPI3+    - RPI3+ 
  - RPI3 builtin bluetooth   - RPI3 builtin bluetooth
  - RPI3 new SD host controller driver   - RPI3 new SD host controller driver
    - \todo Verify: RPI2-1.2 and RPI3 aarch64
   
 ## What needs documenting if it works  ## What needs documenting if it works
   
Line 45  Initial, limited, Raspberry Pi support w Line 48  Initial, limited, Raspberry Pi support w
   
 ## What needs work  ## What needs work
   
    - RPI4 (almost certainly; not clear)
  - USB (host); isochronous transfers.   - USB (host); isochronous transfers.
  - RPI3, RPI0W builtin WiFi   - RPI3, RPI0W builtin WiFi
  - RPI0W Bluetooth Low Energy (probably)   - RPI0W Bluetooth Low Energy (probably)
    - aarch64 support is evolving very rapidly, and not yet recommended for production, largely because one must run -current.
   
 # CPU types  # CPU types
   
Line 55  Initial, limited, Raspberry Pi support w Line 60  Initial, limited, Raspberry Pi support w
  - RPI0 uses "earmv6hf".   - RPI0 uses "earmv6hf".
  - RPI0W uses "earmv6hf".   - RPI0W uses "earmv6hf".
  - RPI2 uses "earmv7hf".   - RPI2 uses "earmv7hf".
  - RPI3 uses "earmv7hf".   - RPI2-1.2 uses "earmv7hf" or "aarch64" (armv8 CPU hardware)
    - RPI3 uses "earmv7hf" or "aarch64" (armv8 CPU hardware)
   
 Note that one can run a build of earmv6hf on the 2 and 3.  There will still be a kernel7, built to use the 2/3 hardware, but with the armv6 instruction set.  Note that one can run a build of earmv6hf on the 2 and 3.  There will still be a kernel7, built to use the 2/3 hardware, but with the armv6 instruction set.
   
Line 63  In theory the code compiled for earmv7hf Line 69  In theory the code compiled for earmv7hf
   
 While the evbarm port has "eb" variants (for big-endian mode), the RPI systems do not support eb and these variants will not work.  Systems built with older CPU architectures (earm, earmv4, earmv5) are not expected to work on RPI.  While the evbarm port has "eb" variants (for big-endian mode), the RPI systems do not support eb and these variants will not work.  Systems built with older CPU architectures (earm, earmv4, earmv5) are not expected to work on RPI.
   
 See also [[NetBSD/aarch64|aarch64]] for running the RPI2-1.2 and RPI3/RPI3+ in 64-bit mode.  The RPI2-1.2 and RPI3 have an armv8 CPU that supports aarch64 (64-bit
   mode) in addition to aarch32 (regular 32-bit ARM).  This is supported,
   in -current only, by the "aarch64" MACHINE_ARCH of evbarm, also
   available in build.sh via the alias evbarm64.  This is sometimes
   referred to as [[NetBSD/aarch64|aarch64]].
   
 # Installation  # Installation
   
Line 98  Consider setting RELEASEMACHINEDIR if yo Line 108  Consider setting RELEASEMACHINEDIR if yo
   
 ### NetBSD autobuild HTTPS/FTP servers  ### NetBSD autobuild HTTPS/FTP servers
   
 NetBSD provides nightly builds on [nyftp.netbsd.org](https://nyftp.netbsd.org/pub/NetBSD-daily/).  The next directory level is the branch being built (netbsd-7, netbsd-8, HEAD, and more), plus optionally things like compiler type.  It is followed by date/time, e.g. "HEAD/201811051650Z"; once a build is complete the symlink "latest" is adjusted to point to it.  The next level is "${MACHINE}-${MACHINE_ARCH}", e.g. "evbarm-earmv7hf", and multiple combinations are provided.  NetBSD provides nightly builds on [nycdn.netbsd.org](https://nycdn.netbsd.org/pub/NetBSD-daily/).  The next directory level is the branch being built (netbsd-7, netbsd-8, HEAD, and more), plus optionally things like compiler type.  It is followed by date/time, e.g. "HEAD/201811051650Z"; once a build is complete the symlink "latest" is adjusted to point to it.  The next level is "${MACHINE}-${MACHINE_ARCH}", e.g. "evbarm-earmv7hf", and multiple combinations are provided.
   
 An example URL, arguably the standard approach for first-time NetBSD/RPI users, is https://nyftp.netbsd.org/pub/NetBSD-daily/netbsd-8/latest/evbarm-earmv7hf/binary/gzimg/  An example URL, arguably the standard approach for first-time NetBSD/RPI users, is https://nycdn.netbsd.org/pub/NetBSD-daily/netbsd-8/latest/evbarm-earmv7hf/binary/gzimg/
   
 ### release layout  ### release layout
   
Line 154  is based on NetBSD-current and is built  Line 164  is based on NetBSD-current and is built 
 work on Raspberry Pi 1, 2 and 3.  This image is typically updated  work on Raspberry Pi 1, 2 and 3.  This image is typically updated
 every few weeks.  every few weeks.
   
  - [https://github.com/ebijun/NetBSD/blob/master/RPI/RPIimage/Image/README](https://github.com/ebijun/NetBSD/blob/master/RPI/RPIimage/Image/README)   - <https://github.com/ebijun/NetBSD/blob/master/RPI/RPIimage/Image/README>
   
 ## Configuring 802.11  ## Configuring 802.11
   
Line 214  A third approach, workable on the Pi 3 o Line 224  A third approach, workable on the Pi 3 o
   
 There is no well-defined USB enumeration order, so the preferred approach if one has multiple USB mass storage devices is to use named wedges in both fstab and cmdline.txt.  There is no well-defined USB enumeration order, so the preferred approach if one has multiple USB mass storage devices is to use named wedges in both fstab and cmdline.txt.
   
   ## Split-mode aarch32/aarch64
   
   \todo Verify this, and add any necessary cautions about boot code.
   
   The aarch64 kernel can run aarch32 binaries, so one can boot a aarch64 kernel on a system with aarch32 userland.
   
 # X11 and GPU  # X11 and GPU
   
 ## Video playback  ## Video playback
Line 236  Using [emulators/retroarch](http://pkgsr Line 252  Using [emulators/retroarch](http://pkgsr
   
  - Install [emulators/retroarch](http://pkgsrc.se/emulators/retroarch)   - Install [emulators/retroarch](http://pkgsrc.se/emulators/retroarch)
  - Install the libretro core for the system you would like to emulate (lets take [emulators/libretro-gambatte](http://pkgsrc.se/emulators/libretro-gambatte), a GameBoy Color emulator, as an example).   - Install the libretro core for the system you would like to emulate (lets take [emulators/libretro-gambatte](http://pkgsrc.se/emulators/libretro-gambatte), a GameBoy Color emulator, as an example).
  - Plug in a USB HID compatible Gamepad, such as the Logitech F710 in "DirectInput" mode (set "D/X" switch to "D").   - Make sure your user has read and write permissions on `/dev/vchiq`.
  - Create a config file for your gamepad using *retroarch-joyconfig*.   - Plug in a USB HID compatible Gamepad, such as the Logitech F710 in "DirectInput" mode (set "D/X" switch to "D"). Note that since the framebuffer GL driver will not allow for keyboard input in RetroArch, you will have to copy your joypad configuration from another system.
 [[!template  id=programlisting text="""   - Configure retroarch by editing $HOME/.config/retroarch/retroarch.cfg:
 $ retroarch-joyconfig -o gamepad.cfg          video_driver = "gl"
 """]]          input_driver = "null"
  - Launch the emulator from the command-line (no X required):          joypad_driver = "sdl2"
 [[!template  id=programlisting text="""          menu_driver = "rgui"
 $ retroarch --appendconfig gamepad.cfg -L /usr/pkg/lib/libretro/gambatte_libretro.so game.gbc  
 """]]  
   
 # Developer notes  # Developer notes
   
Line 273  Tests should be run on all of `rpi[0123] Line 287  Tests should be run on all of `rpi[0123]
 See the anita section in the evbarm page.  See the anita section in the evbarm page.
   
 It is not currently known how to emulate a RPI in qemu, and therefore anita does not yet have support for this.  \todo Add a command-line example to run qemu emulating some RPI model.  It is not currently known how to emulate a RPI in qemu, and therefore anita does not yet have support for this.  \todo Add a command-line example to run qemu emulating some RPI model.
   
   
   # Misc notes
   Miscellaneous notes about Raspberry PI.
   
   ## Power supply needed (or: why there is a little rainbow square in the top-right corner?)
   Raspberry Pi devices are powered by 5V micro USB and a 2.5A (2500mA)
   power supply is reccomended.  For more information please read:
   
    <https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentation/faqs/#pi-power>
   
   Power glitches can also manifest in other ways, e.g. with an USB
   disk plugged:
   
   [[!template id=programlisting text="""
   sd0(umass0:0:0:0): generic HBA error
   sd0: cache synchronization failed
   """]]
   
   Using a reccomended power supply avoid such issues.
   
   ## Xenon death flash (Raspberry Pi 2 is camera-shy)
   When using laser pointers or xenon flashes in cameras (or other
   flashes of high-intensity long-wave light) against a Raspberry Pi
   2 the Pi can power itself off.
   For more information please read:
   
    <https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/xenon-death-flash-a-free-physics-lesson/>

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