Diff for /wikisrc/amazon_ec2.mdwn between versions 1.16 and 1.17

version 1.16, 2011/02/18 03:47:33 version 1.17, 2011/02/18 03:52:23
Line 77  These instances are tied to a *region* ( Line 77  These instances are tied to a *region* (
   
 AKI, or *Amazon Kernel Image*, are a specific type of image. It represents the Xen guest para-virtualized kernel, as used by an AMI. Certain AKIs are allowed to boot customized operating systems, e.g. those that are still not officially supported by Amazon. Thanks to [PyGrub](http://wiki.xensource.com/xenwiki/PyGrub), it can boot a kernel that resides inside an AMI's snapshot.  AKI, or *Amazon Kernel Image*, are a specific type of image. It represents the Xen guest para-virtualized kernel, as used by an AMI. Certain AKIs are allowed to boot customized operating systems, e.g. those that are still not officially supported by Amazon. Thanks to [PyGrub](http://wiki.xensource.com/xenwiki/PyGrub), it can boot a kernel that resides inside an AMI's snapshot.
   
 # Building-up your NetBSD system  # Build-up your NetBSD system
   
 ## Fetch and build NetBSD  ## Fetch and build NetBSD
   
Line 136  Image `NetBSD-AMI.img' complete Line 136  Image `NetBSD-AMI.img' complete
 $ gzip -9n NetBSD-AMI.img  $ gzip -9n NetBSD-AMI.img
 """]]  """]]
   
 # Uploading NetBSD to EC2  # Upload NetBSD to EC2
   
 We must now upload our NetBSD system to EC2. For that, we will have to create a minimalist EC2 instance, to which we will copy our files to construct our snapshots. For that, we will use an Amazon Linux AMI instance.  We must now upload our NetBSD system to EC2. For that, we will have to create a minimalist EC2 instance, to which we will copy our files to construct our snapshots. For that, we will use an Amazon Linux AMI instance.
   
Line 144  EC2 being localized in geographical regi Line 144  EC2 being localized in geographical regi
   
 The examples listed here assume that the instances run in **US East**, within the **c** zone (e.g. **us-east-1c**). To have a list of EC2 regions, you can use the command **ec2-describe-regions**, and **ec2-describe-availability-zones** for availability zones.  The examples listed here assume that the instances run in **US East**, within the **c** zone (e.g. **us-east-1c**). To have a list of EC2 regions, you can use the command **ec2-describe-regions**, and **ec2-describe-availability-zones** for availability zones.
   
 ## Creating the instance  ## Create an Amazon Linux instance
   
 Creating an instance straightforward. Amazon provides [different types of instances](http://aws.amazon.com/ec2/pricing/), with varying levels of billing and reliability. We will use a [*micro* instance](http://aws.amazon.com/ec2/faqs/#How_much_compute_power_do_Micro_instances_provide); its pricing is almost free.  Creating an instance straightforward. Amazon provides [different types of instances](http://aws.amazon.com/ec2/pricing/), with varying levels of billing and reliability. We will use a [*micro* instance](http://aws.amazon.com/ec2/faqs/#How_much_compute_power_do_Micro_instances_provide); its pricing is almost free.
   
Line 162  $ sleep 5 && ec2-describe-instances i-5b Line 162  $ sleep 5 && ec2-describe-instances i-5b
 INSTANCE        i-5babe737      ami-74f0061d    <strong>ec2-67-202-24-108.compute-1.amazonaws.com</strong>       ip-10-99-86-193.ec2.internal    running &lt;your_ssh_key_pair_name&gt;  0               t1.micro        2011-02-17T23:22:37+0000        us-east-1c      aki-427d952b                    monitoring-disabled     67.202.24.108   10.99.86.193                    ebs  INSTANCE        i-5babe737      ami-74f0061d    <strong>ec2-67-202-24-108.compute-1.amazonaws.com</strong>       ip-10-99-86-193.ec2.internal    running &lt;your_ssh_key_pair_name&gt;  0               t1.micro        2011-02-17T23:22:37+0000        us-east-1c      aki-427d952b                    monitoring-disabled     67.202.24.108   10.99.86.193                    ebs
 """]]  """]]
   
 ## Upload your files  ## Create and attach your NetBSD volumes
   
 We will have to create and attach two EBS volumes:  We will have to create and attach two EBS volumes:
   
 1. one to contain the Grub *menu.lst* config file, as well as the NetBSD kernel.  1. one to contain the Grub *menu.lst* config file, as well as the NetBSD kernel.
 1. the other one will contain the root file-system.  1. the other one will contain the root file-system.
   
 ### Creating and attaching volumes  
   
 [[!template id=programlisting text="""  [[!template id=programlisting text="""
 <strong>ec2-create-volume -s 1 -z us-east-1c</strong> # 1GiB -- will be used for Grub and kernel  <strong>ec2-create-volume -s 1 -z us-east-1c</strong> # 1GiB -- will be used for Grub and kernel
 VOLUME  vol-24f88d4c    1               us-east-1c      creating        2011-02-18T00:06:21+0000  VOLUME  vol-24f88d4c    1               us-east-1c      creating        2011-02-18T00:06:21+0000
Line 195  ATTACHMENT      vol-24f88d4c    i-5babe7 Line 193  ATTACHMENT      vol-24f88d4c    i-5babe7
   
 ## Snapshots!  ## Snapshots!
   
 We have to upload the kernel and the NetBSD disk image created earlier, *NetBSD-AMI.img*, to our instance host:  We can now upload the kernel and the NetBSD disk image created earlier, *NetBSD-AMI.img*, to our instance host:
   
 [[!template id=programlisting text="""  [[!template id=programlisting text="""
 # Upload kernel to Linux AMI  # Upload kernel to Linux AMI
Line 206  rsync -aPv -e "ssh -i $EC2_SSH_KEY" NetB Line 204  rsync -aPv -e "ssh -i $EC2_SSH_KEY" NetB
         ec2-user@ec2-67-202-24-108.compute-1.amazonaws.com:          ec2-user@ec2-67-202-24-108.compute-1.amazonaws.com:
 """]]  """]]
   
 Before connecting to the instance, we have to allow connection on SSH port (22) through firewall. Then, log in to the instance, through its name. We will format and mount the Grub partition, create the *menu.lst* file, then copy files to their respective partitions.  Before we can connect to our brand new instance, we have to allow connections on SSH port (22) through the AWS EC2 firewall:
   
 [[!template id=programlisting text="""  [[!template id=programlisting text="""
 $ ec2-describe-instances i-5babe737  
 INSTANCE        i-5babe737      ami-74f0061d    <strong>ec2-67-202-24-108.compute-1.amazonaws.com</strong>       ip-10-99-86-193.ec2.internal    running &lt;your_ssh_key_pair_name&gt;  0               t1.micro        2011-02-17T23:22:37+0000        us-east-1c      aki-427d952b                    monitoring-disabled     67.202.24.108   10.99.86.193                    ebs  
 $ ec2-authorize default -p 22  $ ec2-authorize default -p 22
 GROUP           default   GROUP           default 
 PERMISSION              default ALLOWS  tcp     22      22      FROM    CIDR    0.0.0.0/0  PERMISSION              default ALLOWS  tcp     22      22      FROM    CIDR    0.0.0.0/0
   """]]
   
   Then, log in to the instance, via its name. We will format and mount the Grub partition, create the *menu.lst* file, then copy files to their respective partitions.
   
   [[!template id=programlisting text="""
   $ ec2-describe-instances i-5babe737
   INSTANCE        i-5babe737      ami-74f0061d    <strong>ec2-67-202-24-108.compute-1.amazonaws.com</strong>       ip-10-99-86-193.ec2.internal    running &lt;your_ssh_key_pair_name&gt;  0               t1.micro        2011-02-17T23:22:37+0000        us-east-1c      aki-427d952b                    monitoring-disabled     67.202.24.108   10.99.86.193                    ebs
 $ ssh -i "$EC2_SSH_KEY" ec2-user@ec2-67-202-24-108.compute-1.amazonaws.com  $ ssh -i "$EC2_SSH_KEY" ec2-user@ec2-67-202-24-108.compute-1.amazonaws.com
 [...]  [...]
 [ec2-user@ip-10-99-86-193 ~]$ sudo su  [ec2-user@ip-10-99-86-193 ~]$ sudo su

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  Added in v.1.17


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